Decision-making model

This strategy will help students to:

  • consider their own beliefs about their ability to view situations and events and solve problems

  • explore a series of steps in making decisions in relation to positive sexual behaviours

  • share reasons for making a decision with others.

Implementation

As a facilitator in decision-making, explain to students that:

  • they need to collect accurate information from many sources to inform their decisions

  • they need to identify their feelings and values as these can influence options and choices before accurate assessment of a situation can be made

  • there is the potential for a decision to have positive and negative outcomes and that predicting outcomes can be difficult

  • they are responsible for their actions before a choice is made

  • learning how to make more accurate predictions only comes with practice

  • there may be a need to re-evaluate the decision they make and adapt this to new situations.

What is a problem, choice and decision?

Prior to using a decision-making model, students will need to understand the terms ‘problem', ‘choices' and ‘decisions'. Students who have had no previous involvement in making decisions may find it difficult to identify the problem in a scenario.

  1. Provide your students with the 'Decision-making model' template to use in the decision-making process. 

  2. Ask students to identify the problem and write this in the model.

  3. Ask students to identify and discuss their feelings about the problem.

  4. Students then gather information to identify the range of possible options.

  • Remind students that going to others for information can assist their decision-making, especially when a difficult decision is to be made. However they need to balance their own views with the views of others.

  1. Students write the options they have identified on the model. 

  2. Students consider the consequences (both positive and negative) to evaluate each option. When considering the consequences ensure students look at the different types (i.e. physical, social, emotional, financial and legal). The impact of the consequences on self, family, friends and the community in the short-term and long-term also needs to be examined.

  3.  Students discuss the feelings associated with these consequences and then justify their choice.

Example: Making good choices

Discuss rights and responsibilities, and power in relationships.

Provide each student with a set of scenarios. Using the decision making model, students work through the scenarios to determine possible solutions, consequences and resulting feelings.

Students can share their model with a peer and reflect on the best possible solution to the problem.

Variation

Problem box

Cut a slot in a small box (e.g. photocopy paper box) and place this in the classroom. When students are faced with a problem and need advice or guidance, they can write the problem on paper and place it in the box. The problems should remain anonymous. Work through the problems using a decision-making model either as a class or in small groups.