Yarning quiet ways - FREE

A WA Department of Health resource to help parents and carers of young Aboriginal people yarn about strong, safe and healthy relationships. Age and stage appropriate information for parents of children birth to teens.

Agency: WA Department of Health

Year of publication: 2016

Where to get a hard copy:

For Western Australian schools and organisations:

Free bulk orders can be made via www.dohquickmail.com.au. Please register with an organisational email (gmail and hotmail are not accepted through this automated system). Delivery is only available to WA addresses. 

If you have any problems with the online ordering system, please contact Sharelle Tulloh - Senior Policy Officer for Schools on 9222 4447 or sharelle.tulloh@health.wa.gov.au. 

 

For individual copies:

Please contact Sharelle Tulloh on 9222 4447 or sharelle.tulloh@health.wa.gov.au.

 

Where to download: https://gdhr.wa.gov.au/documents/10184/486309/13152+Yarning+Quiet+Ways.pdf/df93f70b-d6f0-60d1-9af7-bb8c3032feb6?t=1566533467336



13152 Yarning Quiet Ways.pdf (Version 1.1)

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Girls & boys and puberty - FREE

A WA Department of Health booklet for both girls and boys addressing the changes that happen during puberty and how to look after yourself during this time. 'Girls and puberty' can be found on one side and then the booklet can be flipped over to read 'Boys and puberty'. Aimed at ages 10-13+.

Agency: WA Department of Health

Year of publication: 2017

Where to get a hard copy:

For Western Australian schools and organisations:

Free bulk orders can be made via www.dohquickmail.com.au. Please register with an organisational email (gmail and hotmail are not accepted through this automated system). Delivery is only available to WA addresses. 

If you have any problems with the online ordering system, please contact Sharelle Tulloh - Senior Policy Officer for Schools on 9222 4447 or sharelle.tulloh@health.wa.gov.au. 

For individual copies:

Please contact Sharelle Tulloh on 9222 4447 or sharelle.tulloh@health.wa.gov.au.

One 'flip' booklet containing information for boys and girls.

You may also be interested in Relationships, sex and other stuff.

Where to download: https://gdhr.wa.gov.au/documents/10184/486309/Puberty+flip+booklet.pdf/abb2f794-2f3c-4c19-ac16-97dd6edf8aab?t=1549932750000



This Teaching Note appears in the following Learning Activities:

Menstrual cycle

 

Overview

The menstrual cycle is a cycle of bodily changes controlled by a complex relationship between hormones from the brain and ovaries. This cycle causes a ‘bleed’ or period (menstruation) which usually occurs about once a month. The length of the cycle can vary from person to person and also month to month; it is commonly 24-36 days.

The two ovaries contain about 1-2 million eggs each at birth. During the menstrual cycle, the lining of the uterus thickens, making it soft and spongy, as it prepares itself for a possible pregnancy. At the same time, eggs in the ovaries start to ripen and the cervix produces mucus that becomes more clear and slippery. This ‘fertile mucus’ nourishes sperm and helps them move towards the egg.

Once a month, an egg will emerge out of one of the ovaries (ovulation) and begin to travel down the fallopian tube towards the uterus. The egg only lives for up to 24 hours. If the egg is not fertilised by a sperm, there can be no pregnancy. The mucus produced by the cervix becomes thicker, whiter and stickier (‘infertile mucus’) which makes it harder for sperm to penetrate. About 10-14 days after ovulation, the thick lining of the uterus breaks down and is shed through the vagina. This is called menstruation (a period). The first day of a period is the start (day 1) of a new menstrual cycle. Bleeding usually lasts 3-7 days and approximately 4-12 tablespoons of blood will be passed. The blood can vary in colour from red, to brown or black, particularly towards the end of the period. There may also be small clots of blood that are passed.

If a fertilised egg implants into the uterus and a pregnancy begins, the uterus lining will remain and no period (menstruation) will occur.

Menstrual cycle video (external link) - animated video suitable for all ages 2min 36sec

 

When does menstruation begin and end?

The menstrual cycle begins at menarche (the first period) and ends with menopause (the final period). The first period usually starts at around 12 or 13 years but can start as young as 8 or 9 years and as late as 16 years. Menopause usually occurs between the ages of 45 and 55 years.

Differences in menstrual cycles

The menstrual cycle is different for every person and can vary greatly in the following ways:

  • age of onset and cessation

  • amount of blood loss

  • duration of flow

  • amount of discomfort

  • length of cycle

  • mood change

  • physical symptoms.

A doctor should be consulted if:

  • periods have not started by 16 years of age

  • bleeding occurs between periods

  • periods are very heavy or large blood clots (about the size of a 50c coin) are passed

  • the period lasts longer than 8 days

  • despite personal cleanliness there remains a persistent unpleasant odour

  • a period is ‘missed’ after sexual activity.

Managing periods

What can be used:

Pads

  • pads that stick to the inside of underwear to soak up the blood

  • come in many different shapes and types of absorbency (the amount of blood they can soak up)

  • are thrown away after use (in a bin or sanitary disposal unit, not flushed down the toilet)

  • can be purchased from supermarkets, chemists, petrol stations and online.

Reusable pads

  • cloth pads that sit inside underwear (and may have press studs to help keep them in place)

  • are rinsed, soaked overnight and washed so that they can be re-used

  • can be purchased online.

Tampons

  • tampons are tightly packed pieces of cotton that have a string on one end.

  • tampons are put into the vagina to soak up the blood and the string is used to pull them out.

  • available in a range of sizes to absorb different amounts of blood.

  • if inserted correctly they can't be felt and they will not fall out

  • they should be changed every 4-6 hours, or as needed

  • tampons and pads can be used at the same time for heavier flow days, if needed

  • tampons are thrown away after use (in a bin or sanitary disposal unit, not flushed down the toilet)

Menstrual cup

  • small soft rubber cups that are put into the vagina to catch the blood flow

  • need to be emptied and rinsed every 8-12 hours before putting back in

  • need to be sterilised (e.g. using boiling water) at the end of period before storing ready for next month.

Period underwear

  • look and feel like regular underwear but are have a special absorbent section that soaks up the blood (like a pad).

  • are washed and re-used

  • can be used at the same time as tampons for heavier flow days

  • period swimwear is also available

Hygiene

When blood comes in contact with air, an unpleasant odour may develop. Daily showers, clean briefs and frequent changing of the pad or period underwear should prevent this.

The vulva (outside parts of the female genitals) should be washed with warm water. Clean around the labia (lips), clitoris and vaginal opening but not inside the vagina as the vagina is self cleaning. Soap, body wash and other skin cleaning products are not necessary, but if they are used they should be mild and unscented to prevent allergy and dry skin which can lead to irritation.

Vaginal deodorants and douches should be discouraged as they can irritate the vagina and cause infections.

Symptoms

The changes in hormone levels in the body can cause different symptoms such as:

  • cramps

  • headaches

  • sore breasts

  • diarrhoea

  • bloating

  • pimples

  • cravings

  • tiredness

Managing period symptoms:

  • gentle exercise may help with cramps

  • heat pads (wheat or hot water bottle)

  • pain medication like ibuprofen, paracetamol or aspirin

  • avoid smoking, drinking alcohol and taking other mood altering drugs

  • talking to a health professional

External resources

NB: It is essential that teachers preview videos and texts to assess suitability for their students (in accordance with Department of Education policy).

Jean Hailes (external site)

Tampons

Menstrual cups

Period underwear


This Background Note relates to the following Learning Activities:

Parent sample letter - secondary (Version 1.1)

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Parent sample letter - primary (Version 1.1)

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Home partnerships

 

Overview

Relationships and sexuality education (RSE) is a shared responsibility between parents/carers, schools and the community and a great opportunity for all to work together to promote positive attitudes, behaviours and development of important life skills.

Home is the first place a child learns important health messages, beliefs and values that will lay the foundations for their relationships and sexual development. Parents, carers and other significant adults in a child’s life are essential partners with schools in ensuring that children are given accurate, reliable and appropriate health information in a supportive environment. Young people’s perceptions and behaviours are greatly influenced by family and community values, social norms and conditions, and media so the cooperation and support of families needs to be sought from the outset and regularly reinforced.

GDHR recognises parents as the primary sexuality educators of their children. School programs aim to build upon home education and support young people to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes to make informed choices about their relationships and sexual health.  

Most parents support sexual health education in schools, as long as they are informed about what is covered. Research shows that parents want a partnership approach and would like teachers to have specialist training in this area.1 The Department of Health funds Curtin University to manage The RSE Project which offers free professional development to all WA teachers. This includes a two day PD with paid teacher relief and a number of after school workshops. See Professional development for a current list of training opportunities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ways to help strengthen partnerships with parents and carers

  • Offer ‘take-home activities’ that encourage students to continue discussions at home with parents or other trusted adults. (Suggestions for 'take home activities' can be found within the learning activities on GDHR.)

  • Offer after school sessions for parents and children. Invite the school health professionals to come along and meet the parents and explain their role in the school.

  • Offer a parent workshop to inform parents of the content and resources that will be used in the program. These can be facilitated by school staff and/or external providers. See Agencies and programs for a list of possible providers.

  • Invite parents to a lesson presented by the students where they can teach the parents the things they have been learning in class.

  • Invite students to a P&C meeting to run one of the GDHR activities with the committee so that they can see the content and resources used in the lessons.

  • It is important to emphasise to parents that the primary concern of relationships and sexuality education is to promote the safety and wellbeing of children and young people. Ensure parents are aware that RSE covers a broad range of topics that should be taught right from birth such as: protective behaviours; emotional literacy; self-esteem and resilience; and respectful relationships. It is not just about puberty and sex. 

  • Reassure parents that comprehensive RSE programs have been found to:

    • increase young people's confidence and ability to make informed decisions

    • delay first experience of sexual intercourse

    • increase safer sex practices

    • reduce risk taking

    • provide opportunities for young people to learn and discuss relationships and sexual health issues outside the home in a safe, supportive environment.2

  • Keep parents informed by sending home letters about the RSE program you will be conducting in your school. The following sample letters can be used and adapted for your school:

  • Send copies of Talk Soon. Talk Often: a guide for parents talking to their kids about sex home for parents. WA schools can order these books for free. As the book provides age and stage appropriate information for children 0 to 18 years, it is useful to send these booklets out to parents when their child starts at your school. Links to the electronic version can be added to your school website and newsletters.

Frequently asked questions

See the Parent FAQs section for answers to questions such as:

  • Do teachers need to inform parents they are implementing relationships/sexual health education with their class?

  • Should boys and girls be separated for puberty and sexual health education?

  • Can children be withdrawn from lessons?

Parents may also find the Student FAQs section useful for answering some of the 'tricky' questions that may get asked at home and school.

Research and consultations

Parents' attitudes to sexual health education in WA schools: In 2008 consultations were held with the parents of primary and secondary aged school children in metropolitan and country WA. Parents were asked about the ways they currently approached educating their children about sex, reproduction, sexuality and relationships, and the kind of support needed to assist them to more effectively communicate with their children about these topics. Parents were also asked about school sexual health education programs, the role of schools and teachers in the provision of these programs, and parent engagement with the school regarding this particular type of health education program.

In 2018, further parent consultations were held in Perth, Geraldton and Bunbury to update the Talk Soon. Talk Often resource. The new edition is due for release in September 2019.

References

  1. Dyson S. (2010). Parents and sex education: parent’s attitudes to sexual health education in WA schools. Melbourne: La Trobe University.
  2. UNESCO. 2018. International technical guidance on sexuality education: an evidence-informed approach. France: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

Laugh and learn videos - condoms


Year level: 9 or 10

Description

Students develop an understanding of the term 'safer sex' and the importance of using condoms to prevent STIs and pregnancies.

Learning Focus

Being healthy, safe and active

Year 9: Skills to deal with challenging or unsafe situations: refusal skills; initiating contingency plans; expressing thoughts, opinions, beliefs; acting assertively (ACPPS090).

Year 10: Skills and strategies to manage situations where risk is encourged by others (ACPPS091).

Year 10: External influences on sexuality and sexual health behaviours, including the impact decisions and actions have on their own and others' health and wellbeing (ACPPS092).

Communicating and interacting for health and wellbeing

Year 9: Characteristics of respectful relationships: respecting the rights and responsibilities of individuals in the relationship; respect for personal differences and opinions; empathy (ACCPS093).

Year 10: Skills and strategies to promote respectful relationships, such as: appropriate emotional responses in a variety of situations; taking action if a relationship is not respectful (ACCPS093)

Key Understandings

  • 'Safer sex' means using a condom to prevent STIs and unintended pregnancies.

  • Being able communicate with your partner about using condoms is part of a respectful sexual relationship.

Materials

  • Access to internet
  • Laugh and learn video - condoms
  • Teaching resource: life skills (1 per pair) - electronic or hard copy

General Capabilities

No General Capabilities values have been selected.

Health and physical education(P)

Relationships and sexuality

Blooms Revised Taxonomy

No Blooms values have been selected.

Inquiry Learning Phase

No Inquiry Learning phase values have been selected.


Teaching and Learning Activities

Before you get started

Group agreement

Teaching tip: A group agreement must be established before any RSE program begins to ensure a safe learning environment. Read Essential information: Establishing a group agreement for tips on how to create one and what to include.

  1. Revise the class group agreement.
  1. *Trigger warning* Say:

“This lesson covers topics that some students may find distressing. Please let me know if you feel you need to take a break.”

Introduction

  1. Using the One minute challenge teaching strategy students complete this sentence, “To me, safe sex is……..”.
  1. Share in small groups.
  1. Ask for volunteers to share with the class. (Some of the answers may be humorous and that’s ok!)
  1. Say:

“What we will be covering in this session may not be new to many of you. But I am sure that you will all find at least one new and different piece of information – if not more! Everyone needs reminders at different times about keeping ourselves and others safer.”

  1. Explain that the terms ‘safe’ and ‘safer’ are often used interchangeably. In this video the term ‘safe’ is used however the more accurate term is ‘safer’ as no sexual activity is 100% safe. For more detailed explanation see What is safer sex? (external link) and Get the Facts - Safer sex

Laugh and learn video - condoms

  1. Watch Laugh and learn video - condoms (2min 23sec).
  1. Ask the following questions:
  • Why do you think humour is used in this video?

(e.g. negotiating condom use can be difficult and embarrassing; lots of people have negative thoughts and myths about condoms; sex can be embarrassing and people use humour to cope with their embarrassment and/or lack of knowledge)

  • Does it help get information across? How?
  • What is the main message/information you got from this video?
  • Seriously, what is 'safer sex'?

(Using a condom (male or female condom) to reduce the risk of STIs and pregnancy.)

  • Remember the safest sex is no sex at all!

Survey stastics

  1. Say:

“Some of you may have already had some sessions in the past about condoms. Today we are going to revise that and also look at some other issues associated with condom use and safer sex.”

  1. Ask:

“Who thinks that 100% of young people know that using condoms reduces the risk of unplanned pregnancies and STIs?

In 2018, what percentage of Australian Year 10 – 12 students do you think say they always use condoms? Take some answers. (38%)

And what % said they often used them? Take some answers. (24%)

If most people know that it is important to use condoms, why do you think that 62% of those students surveyed said they didn’t always use them?

(e.g. Too embarrassed; condom not readily available when required; partner didn’t want to use; didn’t think about it; didn’t think they would have sex at that moment; not prepared; I don’t like them; my partner doesn’t like them; I trust my partner; we’ve both been tested; I know my partner’s sexual history; it’s not my responsibility; we both haven't had any sexual activity with anyone else before.)"

(Reference: National Survey of Secondary Students and Sexual Health)

Attitudes and values

  1. Say:

"It’s important to understand that knowledge alone isn’t always enough for people to make the safest or healthiest choices. They need to believe that the behaviour is really important and they need to value the outcome – whether that is not getting an STI or having an unplanned pregnancy.

And then people need specific skills to be able to put into practice their knowledge and attitudes and values.

So, Knowledge + Attitudes/Values + Skills (might) = Healthier/safer behaviour."

  1. Say:

"Let’s think about using a condom.

We already know that you have lots of knowledge about how to use condoms and why they should be used.

Let’s look at attitudes and values.

Working in pairs make a list of attitudes and values, beliefs, feelings and opinions that might underlie why some people (especially young people) may choose to use or not use condoms.

People value__________ so might use condoms

People value __________ so might NOT use condoms

not getting an STI their reputation ('slut' vs 'stud') (they worry about being judged for having condoms)
not getting pregnant

their relationship (partner does not want to use a condom)

not getting someone pregnant pleasure (Some people think that sex with a condom is less pleasurable however there are many ways to have pleasurable sex with condoms. Protecting your sexual health and the health of your partner by using condoms helps you to relax and have safe and pleasurable sex)
their lifestyle (i.e. raising a child has financial and time commitments for 18+ years) what other people think of them (e.g. embarrassment buying condoms)
their reputation religion/culture (e.g. using condoms is against their religion; having sex before marriage is against their culture but they want to have sex and take the risk rather than being caught buying/carrying condoms
their relationship monogamy - having one sexual partner (Things to consider: How can I be sure I am in a monogamous relationship? How can I be sure my partner doesn't have an STI? How can I be sure I don't have an STI? How do we prevent unwanted pregnancies?)
their health family (e.g. they may want to have a baby)
keeping themselves safe that there is no/low risk of pregnancy (e.g. they may be in a same-sex relationship or using other contraceptives. Things to consider: how do I protect myself and my partner against STIs?)
keeping their partner safe  
convenience (i.e. people don't need to go to the doctor to get condoms, unlike other contraception)  
peace of mind  
pleasure (i.e. they are not able to enjoy sex if they don't feel safe/protected from risk)  

 

Teaching tips: It is important to consider diversity of sexual identity and sexual behaviours when discussing things such as condom use. Some people may have sexual experiences with people of the same sex and not identify as lesbian, gay or bisexual.

Some STIs can be passed on through oral sex. External condoms (sometimes referred to as male condoms) can reduce the risk of STI transmission during oral sex. Dental dams (external link) can also be used. This is a piece of latex (or polyurethane) that can used between the mouth and vagina or mouth and anus during oral sex.

Internal condoms (sometimes referred to as female condoms) are another contraceptive that prevents both STIs and unintended pregnancy.

  1. Discuss as a whole group. (Note that valuing their reputation and their relationship can be reasons to choose to use or not use condoms.) Point out that different people have different values and individuals have values that may change depending on their stage of life.

Life skills

  1. Say:

“Just because people have knowledge about the correct way to use a condom, and they think that it is important to use condoms, people still need a variety of skills in order to use condoms properly, consistently and respectfully.”

  1. Display Teaching resource: Life skills_Student activity sheet or provide as a handout for students to complete (1 per pair).
  1. Working in pairs, ask students to suggest examples of the life skills being practised when negotiating condom use and using condoms. See Teaching resource: Life skills - answers sheet for possible answers.
  1. Ask for volunteers to give their examples.

Reflection

  1. Ask for volunteers to respond to the question:

“What skill is the most important to you and why?”

  1. Remind students that Get the Facts has a completely confidential ‘ask a question’ service that they may wish to use. All questions are answered by a qualified health professional within a week.

Take home message

  1. Remind students of the take home message:

To encourage better (and more) use of condoms we need:

  • knowledge about how and why to use condoms

  • positive attitudes and values towards using condoms

  • life skills, including being able to communicate with a partner about having safer sex.

Assessment task

An assessment task is linked to this video and activity.

External links

Health promoting schools framework

Backgroud teacher note: Health promoting schools framework.

 

Partnerships with parents

  • Talk soon. Talk often: a guide for parents talking to their kids about sex is a free resource that can be bulk ordered by schools.  Send a copy home to parents prior to starting your RSE program. The booklet offers age and stage appropriate information so that parents can reinforce the topics covered in class. (How to order hardcopies.)

  • Run a parent workshop prior to delivering RSE lessons so that parents can see the resources used, ask questions and find out how to support the school program by continuing conversations at home.

  • Add the Get the Facts and SECCA app links to your website/e-news for parents.

Partnerships with school staff

  • Invite the school health professionals and pastoral care staff (school nurse, school pyschologist, chaplain, boarding house master, etc) to a class or an assembly to introduce them to the students and let them know what their roles are and how they can help the students. For example:

    • If you have concerns about relationships, you can go to...

    • If you have more questions about sexual health, you can go to...

 

 

 

Talk Soon. Talk Often: a guide for parents talking to their kids about sex - FREE

A WA Department of Health booklet developed to support parents to initiate regular and relaxed conversations with their children about sexuality and relationships. Age and stage appropriate information for parents with children birth to teens.

Agency: WA Department of Health

Year of publication: 2013

Where to get a hard copy:

For Western Australian schools and organisations:

Free bulk orders can be made via www.dohquickmail.com.au. Please register with an organisational email (gmail and hotmail are not accepted through this automated system). Delivery is only available to WA addresses.

If you have any problems with the online ordering system, please contact Sharelle Tulloh - Senior Policy Officer for Schools on 9222 4447 or sharelle.tulloh@health.wa.gov.au. 

For individual copies:

Please contact Sharelle Tulloh on 9222 4447 or sharelle.tulloh@health.wa.gov.au OR administration at SHBBVP@health.wa.gov.au.


"" 

 
 

Where to download: /documents/10184/486309/TSTO_V2.pdf/ac053c26-e31d-d863-9704-d91c443195e2?t=1563941085298



This Teaching Note appears in the following Learning Activities:

Who or what will you pick up at the party? - FREE

This WA Department Health booklet provides information about reducing the risks of contracting a sexually transmitted infection or blood-borne virus through activities including unsafe sex, tattooing, piercing and injecting drug use.

Agency: Drug and Alcohol Office

Year of publication: 2015

Where to get a hard copy:

This resource is available to download from the link below.  Alternatively, access the order form located on the Alcohol Think Again website to request a hardcopy.

 

 

Where to download: http://alcoholthinkagain.com.au/Portals/0/documents/publications/Alcohol%20and%20Young%20People/Who%20or%20What%20Will%20You%20Pick%20Up%20at%20the%20Party.pdf



This Teaching Note appears in the following Learning Activities:

Relationships, sex and other stuff - FREE

A WA Department of Health booklet for teenagers addressing friends and relationships, sex and pregnancy.

Agency: WA Department of Health

Year of publication: 2017

Where to get a hard copy:

For Western Australian schools and organisations:

Free bulk orders can be made via www.dohquickmail.com.au. Please register with an organisational email (gmail and hotmail are not accepted through this automated system). Delivery is only available to WA addresses. 

If you have any problems with the online ordering system, please contact Sharelle Tulloh - Senior Policy Officer for Schools on 9222 4447 or sharelle.tulloh@health.wa.gov.au. 

For individual copies:

Please contact Sharelle Tulloh on 9222 4447 or sharelle.tulloh@health.wa.gov.au.

 

Where to download: /documents/10184/486309/HP010369_relationships_sex_and_other_stuff_booklet.pdf/b621349f-e65d-92f9-7b6e-49fd84bb6c65?t=1563942401785



This Teaching Note appears in the following Learning Activities:

Can children be withdrawn from lessons?

A parent or guardian may request that a child be exempt from any class. This request needs to be in writing to the school principal. (Section 72 of the School Education Act 1999) 

If exemption is granted, principals are expected to make reasonable efforts to provide alternative means for exempted students to achieve the same outcomes as other students.

For further information, please refer to the Exemption from Particular Classes Guidelines from the WA Department of Education.

GDHR recognises parents as the primary relationships and sexuality educators of their children. If parents remove their child from school-based lessons it is vital that they ensure their child has access to accurate and reliable health information and the skills and attitudes to make informed choices. Talk Soon. Talk Often. A guide for parents talking to their kids about sex is a free resource that offers age and stage appropriate tips for parents with children aged 0 to 18 years.

Research indicates that the majority of parents support the provision of relationships and sexuality education at school but want to be informed when it is happening to support and complement the program. It is strongly recommended that schools communicate clearly with parents about the nature and content of health-related programs, including relationship and sexual health education. This could be, for example, through:

  • the school council agenda,

  • a school relationships and sexuality education policy

  • newsletters

  • parent workshops or information evenings

  • a letter from the teacher/school (Sample parent letters: primary and secondary).

Do teachers need to inform parents they are implementing relationships/sexual health education with their class?

It is strongly recommended that teachers/schools communicate clearly with parents and caregivers about the nature and content of health-related programs, including relationship and sexual health education. This could be, for example, through:

 

Research indicates that the majority of parents support the provision of sexuality education at school but want to be informed when it is happening to support and complement the program.

Under Section 72 of the School Education Act 1999, a parent or guardian may request that a child be exempt from any class. This request needs to be in writing to the school principal. If exemption is granted, principals are expected to make reasonable efforts to provide alternative means for exempted students to achieve the same outcomes as other students. For further information, please refer to the Exemption from Particular Classes Guidelines from the WA Department of Education.

Laugh and learn videos - puberty part 1


Year level: 7 or 8

Description

Students explore the physical, emotional and social changes associated with puberty.

Learning Focus

Being healthy, safe and active

Year 7: Management of emotional and social changes associated with puberty through the use of: coping skills; communication skills; problem solving skills and strategies (ACCPS071).

Year 8: The impact of physical changes on gender, cultural and sexual identities (ACPPS070).

Key Understandings

  • Puberty is the period of time when your body changes from a child to an adult.

  • There is a wide range of 'normal' when it comes to the physical changes of puberty.

  • Puberty positivity - it's not something to be scared of!

Materials

  • Access to internet
  • Laugh and Learn video - puberty part 1
  • Preferred media for large and small group work and individual work (e.g. paper and textas, or ipads/tablets)
  • Sticky notes/post-it notes
  • A4 coloured card or paper

General Capabilities

No General Capabilities values have been selected.

Health and physical education(P)

Relationships and sexuality

Blooms Revised Taxonomy

No Blooms values have been selected.

Inquiry Learning Phase

No Inquiry Learning phase values have been selected.


Teaching and Learning Activities

Before you get started

Introduction: Brainstorm

  1. Remind students that many of them have probably covered puberty in Years 5 and 6, but there may also be some students who have missed out on formal lessons about puberty. This lesson aims to revise and extend their knowledge.

  1. Say:

 “During this session I want you to think about what you wish you had known about puberty even a year or two ago. What do you think would make it easier for you to deal with the changes of puberty? You may also have young people around you who are asking you questions about puberty. This session can help you to be sure that information that you may want to share will be accurate.”

  1. Brainstorm - Write at least 5 single words (adjectives) that describes how someone might feel about puberty. (Recording options: sitcky notes; wordcloud makers; Mentimeter - wordcloud

  2. Ask for words and record the number of students who have written the same word. Rank and discuss the most common words.

E.g wordcloud creates an image where the most common word is largest.

  1. Ask:

  • Why do you think these words might be the most common?

  • Are they generally positive, negative or neutral words?

Laugh and learn - puberty part 1 video

  1. Ask the following questions:

  • What do you think of the use of humour in this video?

  • Does it help get the information across?

  • What is the message/information you took from this video?

  1. In pairs, on sticky notes, write two myths that students have heard about puberty or that they heard in the video.

  2. With the whole class, facilitate grouping these into same/similar myths into a T-chart (labelled 'myths' and 'facts'). See which myths are most common.

  3. Work through each myth and ask students if they can provide a fact to dispel each myth. See the table below for possible answers. Discuss the corresponding facts addressing any misconceptions, and record on the T-chart. 

Myth

Fact

You ‘catch’ puberty.

Puberty happens to most people. It’s not contagious like an infection or disease. You can’t ‘catch’ it.

Puberty happens overnight.

Puberty takes time.

Puberty happens at the same time for everyone.

Generally puberty starts somewhere between 9 and 15 years.

Puberty happens in the same way for everyone.

Puberty is different for everyone – each body takes its own natural course.

Puberty is scary!

Puberty doesn’t have to be scary or something to worry about.

etc

 

Background teacher notes: Puberty and Menstrual cycle provide teachers with additional professional reading.

Students can use the following free resources as references if required:

Western Australian schools and services can order Boys and Girls & Puberty hardcopies in bulk for free. (How to order.)

  1. Students nominate two myths they wish to work with (make sure all myths are covered). In pairs, write one myth on one side of their A4 coloured card and illustrate with a cartoon. On the other side, write the corresponding fact. Repeat with the other myth. (This activity could also be completed on electronic media.)

  2. Share with whole class.

Optional activity: Sharing

  1. Compile into a book titled Myths and facts about puberty.

  2. Depending on class/school demographics (and with suitable teacher support and supervision), there may be opportunities for some students to share the book with other classes. Alternatively, the books can be given to teachers to share with younger students.

3-2-1 Reflection

  1. 3-2-1 Reflection - Students write on a prepared worksheet or in a journal:
  • 3 x recalls: state three facts about puberty 
  • 2 x so what's: write two things about why this information is relevant and important
  • 1 x questions: write one qustion. For example:
    • Why is it that...?
    • In the future, what will....?
    • How does this affect...?

Take home message

  1. Remind students of the take home message:

Puberty positivity - it's not something you 'catch' and not something to be scared of! Puberty happens to most people and is a normal part of growing up and developing from a child to an adult.

  1. Remind students that Get the Facts has a completely confidential 'Ask a question' service that they may wish to use. All questions are answered by a qualified health professional within a week. 

Health promoting schools framework

Backgroud teacher note: Health promoting schools framework

 

 

 

Partnerships with parents

Partnerships with school staff

  • Invite the school health professionals and pastoral care staff (school nurse, school pyschologist, chaplain, boarding house master, etc) to a class or an assembly to introduce them to the students and let them know what their roles are and how they can help the students. For example:

    • If you get your period at school, you can go to...

    • If you are worried about something and need to talk, you can go to...

Protective Behaviours - Safe 4 Kids

 

Organisers

Safe 4 Kids - Holly-ann Martin

Dates

2 hour professional development and whole day training available. 

Options of in-class modelling of lessons.

Costs

Please see website for details

Location

At your school

Overview

Safe 4 Kids offers:

  • tools and strategies to help teachers feel more confident to teach protective behaviours and body safety to their students. 

  • critical concepts of child abuse prevention education

  • straightforward scripts so teachers have the right words to use in challenging situations

  • how to teach protective behaviours and body safety across the whole curriculum and integrate it into all learning areas.

  • how to use teachable moments that arise throughout the year

Contact Details

Contact Safe 4 Kids on:

info@safe4kids.com.au

0422 971 189

0438 772 668

26 & 27 Sept 2019 - FREE 2 Day Workshop (teacher relief expenses paid) - Relationships and Sexuality Education

 

Organisers

Curtin University - The RSE Project

Dates

Thursday 26 September 2019 & Friday 27 September 2019 (2 days)

Time

8.30am - 4.00pm 

Costs

FREE + cost of teacher relief expenses covered! Schools will be reimbursed for any teaching relief expense they incur (up to $400 per teacher per day). Coverage for non-teaching staff (e.g. nurses) is not available. For people travelling >100km to Perth, some funding is available to assist with travel expenses - please complete the necessary details as part of your registration and we will advise you of the assistance we can provide if/when your place in the workshop is confirmed.

Location

Technology Park Function Centre

2 Brodie-Hall Drive

Bentley, WA 6102 

View map

Overview

Do you need some ideas on how to implement effective relationships and sexuality education in the classroom or school community?


Would you like to increase your confidence and skills to teach this challenging subject area?

This FREE 2-day workshop will assist you to plan, implement and assess effective sexuality and relationships education (SRE) in school settings. We will highlight the Growing & Developing Healthy Relationships resources (see www.gdhr.wa.gov.au) and will also explore other innovative resources and techniques that will help you to present key concepts to students.

This workshop is targeted for individuals working with year 4-10 students.

Full attendance on both days is required. A certificate of attendance will be provided on completion of both days.

Lunch and refreshments are provided.

Topics include:

  • What is meant by RSE?

  • Overcoming barriers to delivering effective RSE\

  • A whole school approach to RSE

  • Affirming diversity

  • Sexually Transmissible Infections

  • Protective behaviours

  • Love and relationships

  • Implicaitons of social media and sexually explicit imagery

  • Engaging classroom strategies

  • Latest resources

 

How to Register

Register at Eventbrite

Contact Details

Scarlett Duncan - scarlett.duncan@curtin.edu.au


Dealing with disclosures

 

Overview

The disclosure by students of personal issues is a possibility in any program that addresses sexuality and relationships. Teachers must be aware of school and legal procedures if a student does disclose personal issues, particularly disclosures of sexual abuse.

Disclaimer: The information given here is intended for information only. If you have a legal issue, you should see a lawyer.

Disclosures of sexual identity/feelings/behaviour

Disclosures of sexual identity/feelings/behaviour concerning themselves or a member of their family may occur if students feel safe and secure. If a student begins to disclose, the teacher can protectively interrupt and suggest the student rephrase the comment using the third person.

Disclosures of assault

Everyone working in a school is responsible for the care and protection of children, and for reporting concerns about child protection. The WA Department of Education's Child Protection policy explains the actions to be taken by staff to protect children in circumstances where abuse is suspected or when allegations of child abuse are made (emotional, physical, sexual, neglect or a child witnessing violence).

Further information is available at the WA Department of Education's Child Protection website.

  • Types of child abuse

  • Definitions

  • How should I respond if a child discloses?

  • What is protective interrupting?

  • Indicators of abuse

Disclosures of sexual abuse

The Children and Community Services Amendment (Reporting Sexual Abuse of Children) Act 2008 requires teachers by law to report alleged child sexual abuse to the Mandatory Reporting Service (MRS) of the Department for Child Protection and Family Support (CPFS).

Teachers, boarding supervisors, police, doctors, nurses and midwives are now legally required to report a belief formed on reasonable grounds of child sexual abuse to MRS. The Act stipulates the penalties that apply for failing to report sexual abuse.

It is not mandatory to report child sexual abuse that occurred before 1 January 2009. Such reports should be made through the principal to the local CPFS office.

A verbal report can be made, but this must be followed by a written report as soon as is practicable, preferably within 24 hours.

  • Department for Child Protection's Mandatory Reporting Service on 1800 708 704 or online.

After a report is made the Mandatory Reporting Service will:

  • acknowledge receipt of the report

  • provide the Western Australia Police with a copy of every written report

  • make enquiries and an assessment to take the necessary action

  • assist the Western Australia Police, who may undertake a separate investigation.

Professional development

All Department of Education (WA) teaching and support staff, boarding supervisors and line managers of staff who have contact with children must complete the online Child Protection and Abuse Prevention course within 6 months of enrolment in the online course. Enrolment occurs automatically for staff who have an E number.

Staff are required to update professional learning in Child Protection and Abuse Prevention every three years from the date of completion. Once this date has elapsed, their status will revert to Not Attempted.


This teaching note appears in the following learning activities:

Considerations before using the 'Laugh and learn' video lesson plans (Version 1.2)

Thumbnail A list of considerations to read before using the 'Laugh and Learn' video lesson plans including useful links to essential information on protective interrupting, gender and sexual diversity, and Department of Education policies.
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Laugh and learn videos - puberty part 2


Year level: 7 or 8

Description

Students explore the physical, emotional and social changes associated with puberty.

Learning Focus

Being healthy, safe and active

Year 7: Management of emotional and social changes associated with puberty through the use of: coping skills; communication skills; problem solving skills and strategies (ACCPS071).

Year 8: The impact of physcial changes on gender, cultural and sexual identities (ACCPS070).

Key Understandings

  • Puberty positivity - positives of puberty and ways to cope with the challenges associated with puberty.

  • Emotional and social changes of puberty and how to manage them.

Materials

  • Access to internet
  • Laugh and Learn video - puberty part 2
  • 3 hoops (or pieces of butchers paper)
  • Stick notes or scrap paper
  • Preferred media for large and small group work and individual work (e.g. paper and textas or iPads/tablets)

General Capabilities

No General Capabilities values have been selected.

No Australian Curriculum values have been selected.

Blooms Revised Taxonomy

No Blooms values have been selected.

Inquiry Learning Phase

No Inquiry Learning phase values have been selected.


Teaching and Learning Activities

Before you get started

Introduction: Laugh and learn videos - puberty part 2

  1. Say:

"Many of you have probably covered much of this information in primary school. This session is going to look at what you would like to have known about puberty when you first started learning about it. As with all things, there are positive and there are challenges about puberty."

  1. Watch Laugh and learn video - puberty part 2

  2. Ask the following questions:

  • What do you think of the use of humour in this video?
  • Does it help get information across?
  • What is the message/information you got from this video?

Think Pair Share: Puberty Positivity

  1. Think-pair-share: Discuss the positives of puberty (Puberty positivity). 

Possible answers: getting older and more mature; having greater independence; body changes are interesting; able to do different things; getting taller and stronger.

Students may like to use the following resources for reference: 

Girls & Puberty/Boys & Puberty (How to order hardcopies.)

Relationships, sex and other stuff (How to order hardcopies.)

Get the Facts - puberty

Get the Facts - puberty animation

  1. Share ideas with whole class and discuss.

Guess my category: Changes during puberty

  1. Acknowledge some of the negatives that many people associate with puberty.

  2. Guess my category: Place three hoops on the group (or butchers paper, or record electronically) to represent the categories 'physical', 'emotional', and 'social/relationships' but do not tell the students what they respresent (i.e. do not label the categories). 

  3. Ask students to write a challenge associated with puberty onto sticky notes. Read each sticky note to the class and place them into the relative hoop. 

  4. Ask:

  • How have I grouped these answers? or Why have I grouped the answers this way?

  • What labels would you give each group?

  • Do any of the groups overlap? (Hoops can then be joined to form a Venn diagram and sticky notes regrouped accordingly)

  • Do some groups have more sticky notes than others? Why do you think this is? (Society? Parents? Culture? Pressure?)

Possible responses

*Trigger warning* Students may raise sensitive topics in this session. Teachers will need to be prepared for potential responses related to things such as gender identity, sexual identity, religious beliefs, cultural beliefs, etc). 

Physical

Emotional

Social/relationship

Getting first period

Mood swings/mood changes

Changing relationships with friends

Waiting for first period

Embarrassed

Best friend moves to a different school
Period cramps Anxiety Best friend has a boyfriend/girlfriend (and not time for me)
Managing periods at school or when out Selfishness Friend smoking/drinking/using drugs and I don't like it
Sweat/body odour Become self-involved I fancy my best friend
Developing breasts (or not developing breasts, size of breasts) Withdrawn Nasty things were posted about me online
Voice breaking Isolated Not fitting in (i.e. not having the 'right' clothes, phone, etc)
Growing pains Emotional Challening family boundaires
Getting taller (or not getting taller) Fear of being judged Too much independence/not enough independence
Pimples and acne No one understands me I'm not allowed to date boys/girls
Pubic hair (growing early, growing late, growing too much, not growing enough, etc) My parent's don't 'get' me I have a curfew
Making decisions about whether to remove hair or not  Exam pressure I have to work/do chores
Weight gain Negative body image (dieting, eating disorders, self-harm) I'm not allowed to cut my hair, get a piercing, shave my legs, etc
etc Confusion Not allowed to go out without an adult
  Sexual feelings Restrictions on screen time/internet/phone use
  Shy Restrictions on clothing (e.g. Mum says I can't leave the house like that. e.g. cultural clothing)
  etc Fancing someone and not being able to talk to them
    All my friends have boyfriends/girlfriends. I don't
    Crushes
    Dealing with rejection
    Navigating new relationships
    Breaking up
    Questioning sexual identity (e.g. Am I gay?)
    I sent a naked pic
    A private image I sent got shared without consent
    etc

 

Mind map: Positive coping strategies

  1. Say: 

"It is important for people to have a range of positive coping strategies to help with the potential challenges of puberty. No one person will feel exactly the same as others and no one strategy will work for everyone, so lots of different ideas are needed. Lots of skills that you already have can be used to think about how you can deal with these potential challenges - seeking help, problem solving, and communication. We are going to come up with lots of ways that you or someone you know might find useful."

  1. In pairs, students to be given one challege of puberty. Use the mindmap strategy to brainstorm some ways of dealing positively with the challenge allocated. (PC options: Word SmartArt Tools; Canva - Education - Mindmap; XmindBubble.us. Table app: Popplet). Model an example and have students offer some postive coping strategies. 

  1. Other possible copings strategies
  • Talking to a teacher/school nurse/school pyschologist/chaplain/doctor
  • Getting enough sleep
  • Turning off phones/devices and going outside
  • Using Kids Helpline
  • Meditation/Yoga
  • Remembering that puberty doesn't last forever - you will get though it!
  • Getting questions answered on Get the Facts website
  1. Share and display the mindmaps.

Reflection: What I wish I had know about puberty BEFORE puberty!

  1. Using preferred medium, students complete the following sentence:

'Puberty! I wish I had known that....because...'

Examples:

Puberty! I wish I had known that I could talk to Headspace when I was feeling low because I didn't realise there were so many organisations like Headspace that offer help for free.

Puberty! I wish I known that I didn't need to worry about hair growing in weird places because now I think it's cool.

*Trigger warning* Some students may disclose personal information when using 'I' statements. Some students may find this 'I' statement too personal or confronting. Consider if this following alternate wording is better for your students or offer them the choice.

'Puberty! One thing I would tell someone that is about to start going through puberty is....because...'

  1. Share in small groups.

Conclusion

  1. Discuss the following in small groups or record in a journal.
  • How easy was it to think of the positives of puberty? Why?
  • Why does puberty have so much misinformation around it?
  • What are two coping strategies that appeal to you and why do you like them?
  • What's one positive thing about puberty that you would say to a younger person?

Take home message

  1. Remind students of the take home message:

Puberty positivity! There are many positives about puberty - and also some challenges. Most people find sharing their thoughts and concerns with others helps them to deal with puberty in a positive way. 

  1. Remind students that there are lots of free services that offer help to young people over the phone, online chat and in person if they need help. See Websites - Students for a list of reliable websites and services for young people.

  2. Remind students that Get the Facts has a completely confidential 'Ask a question' service they may wish to use. All questions are answered by a qualified health professional with a week. 

Assessment task

Health promoting schools framework

Background teacher note: Health promoting schools framework

 

Partnerships with parents

Partnerships with schools staff

  • Invite the school health professionals and pastoral care staff (school nurse, school pyschologist, chaplain, boarding house master, etc) to a class or an assembly to introduce them to the students. Have them talk to the students about their role and how they can help. For example:
    • If you get your period at school and need help, you can go to...
    • If you are worried about something and need to talk, you can go to...

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