Reproductive systems


Year level: 5

Description

Students develop an understanding of the parts and functions of the reproductive systems. This provides foundation knowledge for learning about about puberty, menstruation, conception and pregnancy.

Learning Focus

Being healthy, safe and active (ACCPS052)

Changes associated with puberty which vary with individuals: physical; mental; and emotional.                      

Key Understandings

  • The reproductive system consists of the body parts that are needed to create a baby.

  • There are ways that men's and women's bodies are the same and there are ways that they are different.

  • Both men's and women's bodies play an important role in reproduction. 

  • Bodies grow and change over time. 

  • Everyone body is unique and varies in size, shape, function.

Materials

  • 'Goodie bag' made up of assorted craft and/or reusable objects e.g. glue, sticky tape, plastic cup, blu tack, balloons, plastic spoon, straws, pop sticks, bottle tops, etc (one per group)
  • Large pieces of poster paper or butcher's paper (1 per group)
  • Room preparation: space for small groups to work with large poster paper (e.g. desks pushed to the side for clear floor space)
  • Teaching resource: male or female reproductive system labelled diagrams (one per group - electronic or hard copy)
  • Optional: Girls and Puberty/Boys and Puberty booklets; or internet access
  • Optional: Magno-mate kit from SHQ

General Capabilities

No General Capabilities values have been selected.

Health and physical education(P)

Personal, social and community health

This strand will develop students' knowledge, understanding and skills to support a positive sense of self, to effectively respond to life events and transitions and to engage in their learning. Effective communication, decision-making and goal-setting skills are integral to this strand as they help to establish and maintain relationships in family, school, peer group and community settings, support healthy and safer behaviours, and enable advocacy. Students will source and examine a range of health information, products, services and policies, and evaluate their impact on individual and community health and safety.

Relationships and sexuality

Blooms Revised Taxonomy

No Blooms values have been selected.

Inquiry Learning Phase

No Inquiry Learning phase values have been selected.


Teaching and Learning Activities

Before you get started

Room preparation

This lesson requires space for students to work in groups - either on the floor or at desks. Desks can be pushed to the sides of the classroom or a music room/hall/art room/etc can be used. 

NB: Ensure the chosen room has sufficient privacy. Students may feel self conscious and disengage if other students or teachers are able to see inside the room or enter the room unexpectedly.

Group agreement

Teaching tip: A group agreement must be established before any RSE program begins to ensure a safe learning environment. Read Essential information: Establishing a group agreement for tips on how to create one and what to include.

  1. Revise the class group agreement.

Energiser: Birthday line up

Teaching Tip: Relationships and sexuality may be an exciting and interesting topic for some students; for others it may be embarrassing, uncomfortable or scary. Introducing each lesson with fun energisers that promote safe touch and group collaboration can help students to feel more comfortable.

  1. Birthday line up (external link): Challenge students to line up in the order of their birthdays without talking. Easier version - line up by day and month only. Harder version - line up by day, month and year. Avoid giving further instructions as part of the challenge is for students to determine which order the line is going in and different ways of communicating their birthday without talking.
  1. Once the students have lined themselves in order have them call out their birthdays as you move down the line to see if they ordered themselves correctly.
  1. Briefly discuss the various methods of communication used. What methods worked well? What methods did not work so well?
  1. Divide the line into groups of 4-6 for the next activity. 

'Goodie bag' models

  1. Ask:

  • What are some ways that men's and women's bodies are the same? (Both usually have legs, arms, eyes, nipples, toes, hair, etc. Both can usually talk, dance, eat, etc).

Teaching Tip:  This is a good opportunity to remind students of the diversity of bodies. Some people have disabilities, injuries or illnesses that mean their bodies may look or function in different ways. Everyone has a unique body that deserves respect. 

  • What are some of the ways that men's and women's bodies are different? (Men usually have a penis, women usually have a vulva, women may have larger breasts than men, men may have more facial hair than women, women usually have a uterus, men usually have testicles, etc)

Teaching tipUsing inclusive language such as 'usually' and 'may have' is a simple way to help make all people feel more included. Avoid using words like 'normally' and 'always' as it makes any other variation seem abnormal and negative.

  1. Say:

"Many of the differences between men's and women's bodies are to do with their reproductive organs/system.  (Reproduction means to make more of or to multiply). These are the parts of the body that are needed to create a baby. Both men's and women's bodies play an important role in reproduction. Today we are going to look at the parts of the male and female reproductive system and what they do (their function)." 

  1. Provide each group with a large piece of poster paper, a 'goodie bag' and a copy of a male or female reproductive system with labels (Teacher Resource: Male and female reproductive system - labelled). Optional: copies of Girls and Puberty/Boys and Puberty.

  2. Instruct half of the groups to create the 'male reproductive system' and the other half to create the 'female reproductive system' using the items in the bag.

  3. They do not need to use everything in the bag and they can label the parts using coloured markers.

Teaching tip: The focus of this activity should not be on labelling the more complex parts and knowing their detailed medical functions. Whilst it is important that students know the correct names for body parts such as the penis, testicles, vulva, vagina, uterus/womb and clitoris, it is not important for students to know all of the reproductive organ technical terms for every reproductive part. For example, knowing that sperm travels through tubes that run from the testicles to the tip of the penis and out of the body is more important than labelling the epididymis and vas deferens. Understanding that there are glands that add fluid to the semen is more important than being able to spell the names of the different glands. This activity is to help students to understand how the parts are connected and the basic functions to help understand future concepts of puberty, menstruation and conception.

  1. Invite students to do a 'walk around' to see all of the models. Ask volunteers to share a description of their model so far.

Teaching tip: In RSE it is important to avoid calling upon specific students for contributions, always ask for volunteers and remind students of their 'right to pass' as part of the group agreement

 

Reflection: Everyone is unique

  1. The Magno-mate reproductive kit is available for purchase or hire from Sexual Health Quarters.  Alternatively, use the images provided in 'Related Items'.

  2. Use the 'goodie bag' models and relate each part to the magno-mate kit to provide a simple explanation of the male and female reproductive system. This need only be a simple, story-like explanation.  

e.g. For female reproductive system:

"The ovaries are where the eggs are made and stored. They also make hormones. Most girls are born with all of the (immature) eggs that they will ever have. These tubes (fallopian tubes) carry the eggs from the ovaries to the uterus. The uterus is where a baby grows during pregnancy. The vagina is the passageway from the uterus to the outside of the body. It is where the baby comes out and the penis goes in during sexual intercourse. The vulva is the name for the outside sexual parts - the inner lips, outer lips and the clitoris. The clitoris has lots of nerve endings, like the penis and is very sensitive. The outer lips become overed in hair during puberty. Both the inner and outer lips come in many different shapes, sizes and colours. This is the bladder, where urine collects. This tube (urethra) carries urine out of the body from the bladder. The opening is just in front of the opening of the vagina. This is the anus, where faeces (poo) comes out.

e.g. For male reproductive system

"The scrotum is the sack that holds the testicles. This is where the sperm are made. Millions of sperm are made every day. The testicles also make hormones. This is the penis, it comes in a range of sizes, shapes and colours. It has lots of nerve endings and is very sensitive. The penis has spongey tissue that can fill with blood and make the penis go hard (erection). These are the tubes that carry sperm from each of the testicles to the outside of the body through the tip of the penis. These glands make fluid that make part of the semen (which carries the sperm). This tube (urethra) runs from the bladder to the opening in the tip of the penis. It carries urine (wee) and semen out of the body. The bladder is where urine collects. The fold of skin that covers the head of the penis is called the foreskin. Some people have part or all of this skin removed (often as a baby) - this is called being circumcised. This is the anus, where faeces (poo) comes out."

  1. Explain:

"Everyone's body is different. Just as people have different height and hair colour, people also have differences in their reproductive organs. Penises, breasts and vulvas all come in different shapes, sizes and colours (despite what we see in the media).

Some people are born with natural variations in reproductive organs (and hormones and chromosomes) that don't fit into the typical definitions for male and female bodies that we have looked at today. This is called intersex.

Our bodies change over time. Puberty is the time when the body changes from a child to an adult. The changes to the reproductive organs are what makes it possible for people to have babies. We will be looking at these changes over the next few lessons."

The most important thing to remember is that everyone has a unique body that deserves respect."

Question box

Teaching tip: Establishing a question box when starting any RSE program is useful to allow students to ask questions anonymously and have them answered in a safe environment. Read Essential information: Question box guide for how to set up the system and how to answer tricky questions. 

  1. Provide students with time to write questions for the question box. 
  1. If the question box is already set up, you may like to choose some questions related to the reproductive systems to answer.

Health promoting schools framework

Background teacher note: Health promoting schools framework.

 

Partnerships with parents

Partnerships with school staff

  • Invite the school nurse to your class to answer some of the question box questions. This serves two purposes - they may be able to answer some of the questions you are unsure of and it introduces the students to the nurse.

Puberty part 2


Year level: 7 or 8

Description

Students explore the physical, emotional and social changes associated with puberty.

 

Learning Focus

Being healthy, safe and active

Year 7: Management of emotional and social changes associated with puberty through the use of: coping skills; communication skills; problem solving skills and strategies (ACCPS071).

Year 8: The impact of physical changes on gender, cultural and sexual identities (ACCPS070).

 

Key Understandings

enlightened Puberty positivity - positives of puberty and ways to cope with the challenges associated with puberty.

enlightened Emotional and social changes of puberty and how to manage them.

Prior knowledge

 

Materials

  • Access to internet
  • Laugh and Learn video - puberty part 2 (2min 19sec)
  • 3 hoops (or pieces of butchers paper)
  • Stick notes or scrap paper
  • Preferred media for large and small group work and individual work (e.g. paper and textas or iPads/tablets)

General Capabilities

No General Capabilities values have been selected.

No Australian Curriculum values have been selected.

Blooms Revised Taxonomy

No Blooms values have been selected.

Inquiry Learning Phase

No Inquiry Learning phase values have been selected.


Teaching and Learning Activities

Before you get started

 

Group agreement

yes Teaching tip: A group agreement must be established before any RSE program begins to ensure a safe learning environment. Read: Essential information: Establishing a group agreement for tips on how to create one and what to include.

  1. Revise the class group agreement

Introduction: Laugh and learn videos - puberty part 2

  1. laugh Say:

"Many of you have probably covered much of this information in primary school. This session is going to look at what you would like to have known about puberty when you first started learning about it. As with all things, there are positive and there are challenges about puberty."

  1. Watch Laugh and learn video - puberty part 2 (2min 19sec)

  1. Ask the following questions:

❓ What do you think of the use of humour in this video?

❓ Does it help get information across?

❓ What is the message/information you got from this video?

Think-pair-share: Puberty positivity

  1. Think-pair-share: Discuss the positives of puberty (Puberty positivity). 

Possible answers: getting older and more mature; having greater independence; body changes are interesting; able to do different things; getting taller and stronger.

Students may like to use the following resources for reference: 

              How to order hardcopies

Get the Facts - puberty

Get the Facts - puberty animation

  1. Share ideas with whole class and discuss.

Guess my category: Changes during puberty

  1. Acknowledge some of the negatives that many people associate with puberty.

  2. Guess my category: Place three hoops on the group (or butchers paper, or record electronically) to represent the categories 'physical', 'emotional', and 'social/relationships' but do not tell the students what they respresent (i.e. do not label the categories). 

  3. Ask students to write a challenge associated with puberty onto sticky notes. Read each sticky note to the class and place them into the relative hoop. 

  4. laugh Ask:

❓ How have I grouped these answers? or Why have I grouped the answers this way?

❓ What labels would you give each group?

❓ Do any of the groups overlap? (Hoops can then be joined to form a Venn diagram and sticky notes regrouped accordingly)

❓ Do some groups have more sticky notes than others? Why do you think this is? (Society? Parents? Culture? Pressure?)

Possible responses

⚠️Trigger warning Students may raise sensitive topics in this session. Teachers will need to be prepared for potential responses related to things such as gender identity, sexual identity, religious beliefs, cultural beliefs, etc). 

Physical

Emotional

Social/relationship

Getting first period

Waiting for first period

Period cramps

Managing periods at school or when out

Sweat/body odour

Developing breasts

Not developing breasts

Size of breasts

Voice breaking

Growing pains

Getting taller

Not getting taller

Pimples and acne

Pubic hair (growing early, growing late, growing too much, not growing enough, etc)

Making decisions about whether to remove hair or not

Weight gain

etc

 

Mood swings/mood changes

Embarrassed 

Anxiety

Selfishness

Become self-involved

Withdrawn

Isolated

Emotional

Fear of being judged

No one understands me

My parents don't 'get' me

Exam pressure

Negative body image (dieting, eating disorders, self-harm)

Confusion

Sexual feelings

Shy

etc

Changing relationships with friends

Best friend moves to a different school

Best friend has a boyfriend/girlfriend (and no time for me)

Friend smoking/drinking/using drugs and I don't like it

I fancy my best friend

Nasty things were posted about me online

Not fitting in (i.e. not having the 'right' clothes, phone, etc)

Challenging family boundaries

Too much independence or not enough independence

I'm not allowed to date boys/girls

I have a curfew

I have to work or do chores

I'm not allowed to cut my hair, get a piercing, shave my legs, etc

Not allowed to go out without an adult

Restrictions on screen time/internet/phone use

Restrictions on clothing (e.g. Mum says I can't leave the house like this. e.g. 2 Cultural clothing)

Fancying someone and not being able to tell them

All my best friends have boyfriends/girlfriends. I don't.

Crushes

Dealing with rejection

Navigating new relationships

Breaking up

Questioning sexual identity (e.g. Am I gay?)

I sent a naked pic

A private image I sent got shared without consent

etc

 

Mind map: Positive coping strategies

  1. laugh Say: 

"It is important for people to have a range of positive coping strategies to help with the potential challenges of puberty. No one person will feel exactly the same as others and no one strategy will work for everyone, so lots of different ideas are needed. Lots of skills that you already have can be used to think about how you can deal with these potential challenges - seeking help, problem solving, and communication. We are going to come up with lots of ways that you or someone you know might find useful."

  1. In pairs, students to be given one challege of puberty. Use the mindmap strategy to brainstorm some ways of dealing positively with the challenge allocated. (PC options: Word SmartArt Tools; Canva - Education - Mindmap; XmindBubble.us. Table app: Popplet). Model an example and have students offer some postive coping strategies. 

  1. Other possible copings strategies:
  • Talking to a teacher/school nurse/school pyschologist/chaplain/doctor
  • Getting enough sleep
  • Turning off phones/devices and going outside
  • Using Kids Helpline
  • Meditation/Yoga
  • Remembering that puberty doesn't last forever - you will get though it!
  • Getting questions answered on Get the Facts website
  1. Share and display the mindmaps.

Reflection: What I wish I had know about puberty BEFORE puberty!

  1. Using preferred medium, students complete the following sentence:

'Puberty! I wish I had known that....because...'

Examples:

Puberty! I wish I had known that I could talk to Headspace when I was feeling low because I didn't realise there were so many organisations like Headspace that offer help for free.

Puberty! I wish I known that I didn't need to worry about hair growing in weird places because now I think it's cool.

⚠️Trigger warning Some students may disclose personal information when using 'I' statements. Some students may find this 'I' statement too personal or confronting. Consider if this following alternate wording is better for your students or offer them the choice.

'Puberty! One thing I would tell someone that is about to start going through puberty is....because...'

  1. Share in small groups.

Conclusion

  1. Discuss the following in small groups or record in a journal.

❓ How easy was it to think of the positives of puberty? Why?

❓ Why does puberty have so much misinformation around it?

❓ What are two coping strategies that appeal to you and why do you like them?

❓ What's one positive thing about puberty that you would say to a younger person?

Take home message

  1. Remind students of the take home message:

enlightenedPuberty positivity! There are many positives about puberty - and also some challenges.

enlightened Most people find sharing their thoughts and concerns with others helps them to deal with puberty in a positive way. 

  1. Remind students that there are lots of free services that offer help to young people over the phone, online chat and in person if they need help. See Websites - Students for a list of reliable websites and services for young people.

  2. Remind students that Get the Facts has a completely confidential 'Ask a question' service they may wish to use. All questions are answered by a qualified health professional with a week. 

 

Assessment task

 

Health promoting schools strategies

Background teacher note: Health promoting schools framework

Partnerships with parents

Partnerships with schools staff

  • Invite the school health professionals and pastoral care staff (school nurse, school pyschologist, chaplain, boarding house master, etc) to a class or an assembly to introduce them to the students. Have them talk to the students about their role and how they can help. For example:
    • If you get your period at school and need help, you can go to...
    • If you are worried about something and need to talk, you can go to...

sexting.JPG (Version 1.0)

Thumbnail
Preview

So what is a vulva anyway? - FREE

This UK resource is aimed at educating young people about the vulva (the outside part of the female reproductive system that is often misnamed ‘vagina’). The booklet uses illustrations to normalise the wide range of ‘normal’ when it comes to the appearance of the vulva. It also details the changes which happen during puberty that are often not described.

Agency: Brooks - UK

Year of publication: 2018

Where to get a hard copy:

This booklet is available in pdf only:

 

 

Where to download: https://gdhr.wa.gov.au/documents/10184/486309/So_what_is_a_vulva_anyway_final_booklet+%281%29.pdf/11c57b56-1f7e-7fed-2580-85f34c37909a?t=1574124211050



This Teaching Note appears in the following Learning Activities:

So_what_is_a_vulva_anyway_final_booklet (1).pdf (Version 1.0)

Thumbnail
Preview
1 of 17

School grants

 

Organisers

The Sexual Health and Blood-borne Virus Program, WA Department of Health.

Dates

Apply now for grants for the 2020 school year.

Overview

The Department of Health are offering small grants (of up to $850) to schools to support their Relationships and Sexuality Education programs. The aim of these grants is to provide resources that will assist in the provision of effective Relationships and Sexuality Education. 

Schools can apply for grants to run the following types of activities:

  1. Parent workshops - facilitated by teachers and/or students.

  2. Competitions to create adverts (radio/TV/social media) promoting positive RSE behaviours (e.g. how to seek help, how to manage changes, bodily autonomy).

  3. Creation of a specific 'health' room that can be used to display RSE health messages and posters.

  4. Creations of a collaborative art piece with an RSE theme.

  5. Development of a puberty kit for puberty lessons (with examples of products that relate to puberty - e.g. pads, tampons, period knickers, bra, shaver, deodorant, etc). See GDHR Puberty Kits lesson.

  6. Creation of 'goodie bags' of assorted craft materials for the GDHR Year 5 and Year 6 Reproductive systems lessons.

  7. Purchase of books/resources to support the GDHR lessons (see list of suggested resources in downloads section below).

  8. Development of a whole school RSE Policy in consultation with parents.

  9. Development and implementation of a student led initiative to improve RSE knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviours of peers.

  10. An idea of your own! Approval to be gained following a discussion with a GDHR Health Department representative. 

Grants can be used for prizes, venue hire, equipment hire/purchases, resources, catering (up to $100). Grants cannot be used for internal salaries and wages.

Instructions for applying

Please read the eligibility criteria and complete the application form, returning it by 5pm Friday 20 December 2019.

Email applications to sharelle.tulloh@health.wa.gov.au.

Confirmation of your application will be provided within three (3) business days. If you have any questions or have not received confirmation of an application, please contact Sharelle Tulloh on 9222 4447.

Eligibility criteria

  • You must be a school in Western Australia

  • The short project undertaken in your school must directly link to the RSE program offered to your school's students and parents.

  • The short project must be based on one of the RSE topics and/or lessons listed (See Learning Activities for further ideas).

  • The applicant must be willing to discuss the project with a member of the Department of Health via email or phone if further clarification of the project is required.

  • Upon completion of the project the applicant will complete the evaluation form to provide a brief summary of the project implementation, evaluation of its results and the acquittal of funds (submitted no later than the end of Term 4 2020). This may be used in Department of Health publications, on the GDHR website or on The RSE Facebook page.

  • The school is able to provide an invoice with an ABN for payment of the grant prior to 31 July 2020.

Grant approval process

Each application will be considered based on its merits with reference to the following points:

  • Evidence of how the proposed project meets the eligibility criteria.

  • Evidence of how the grant assists the school's implementation of the RSE project.

  • Evidence of how the grant will benefit the students and the wider school community's understanding of RSE.

  • The overall appeal and suitability of the proposed project.

Dependent on the number of applicants, between 5 and 10 schools will be selected for grants of $500-$850.

Successful applicants will be notified by 20 January 2020.

Download(s)

Application form
Application information and eligibility
List of suggested resources for purchase

How to Register

Complete the application form and email to sharelle.tulloh@health.wa.gov.au by 20 December 2019.

Contact Details

sharelle.tulloh@health.wa.gov.au

9222 4447

Porn: The who, what, where, when, why and why not


Year level: 9 or 10

Description

Coming soon! Students use the placemat strategy to develop an understanding of what porn is, its possible harms, and information about why and where people may access porn. Strategies for dealing with unwanted exposure to porn are also discussed.

Learning Focus

Coming soon!

Key Understandings

Coming soon!

Materials

There are no listed materials.

General Capabilities

No General Capabilities values have been selected.

No Australian Curriculum values have been selected.

Blooms Revised Taxonomy

No Blooms values have been selected.

Inquiry Learning Phase

No Inquiry Learning phase values have been selected.


Teaching and Learning Activities

Coming soon!

Sex and the media - stereotypes


Year level: 9 or 10

Description

Coming soon! Students extend and apply their knowledge, understanding and attitudes about gender stereotyping in the media by critiquing media advertising and global organisations that are working towards eliminating outdated gender stereotypes. 

Learning Focus

Coming soon!

Key Understandings

Coming soon!

Materials

There are no listed materials.

General Capabilities

No General Capabilities values have been selected.

No Australian Curriculum values have been selected.

Blooms Revised Taxonomy

No Blooms values have been selected.

Inquiry Learning Phase

No Inquiry Learning phase values have been selected.


Teaching and Learning Activities

Coming soon!

Sex and the media - body image


Year level: 9 or 10

Description

Coming soon!

Learning Focus

Coming soon!

Key Understandings

Coming soon!

Materials

There are no listed materials.

General Capabilities

No General Capabilities values have been selected.

No Australian Curriculum values have been selected.

Blooms Revised Taxonomy

No Blooms values have been selected.

Inquiry Learning Phase

No Inquiry Learning phase values have been selected.


Teaching and Learning Activities

Coming soon!

Blood-borne virus safety


Year level: 9 or 10

Description

Explore the ways that blood-borne viruses (BBVs) can be transmitted and prevented.

Learning Focus

Being healthy, safe and active 

Year 9: Actions and strategies to enhance health and wellbeing in a range of environments such as: the use of complementary health practices to support and promote good health; identifying and managing risky situations; safe blood practices (ACPPS091).

Being healthy, safe and active

Year 10: Skills and strategies to manage situations where risk is encouraged by others (ACPPS091).

Key Understandings

enlightened BBVs can be transmitted through blood to blood contact and body fluids such as semen and vaginal sex (when a virus is present).

enlightened BBVs often don't have symptoms for many years which means many people don't realise they have a BBV.

enlightened If left untreated, BBVs can cause serious long term health problems.

enlightened BBVs are easily preventable by: using a condom when having sex; not sharing needles; getting piercing/tattoos from reputable places that use safe blood practices; having vaccinations (hep B). 

enlightened If a person has a BBV it can be easily managed and treated and some can be cured.

Materials

  • Access to computers and internet
  • Laugh and learn - BBV safety video (1min 46sec)
  • Preferred media to record and display research

General Capabilities

No General Capabilities values have been selected.

No Australian Curriculum values have been selected.

Blooms Revised Taxonomy

No Blooms values have been selected.

Inquiry Learning Phase

No Inquiry Learning phase values have been selected.


Teaching and Learning Activities

Before you get started

Group agreement

yes Teaching tip: A group agreement must be established before any RSE program begins to ensure a safe learning environment. Read Essential information: Establishing a group agreement for tips on how to create one and what to include.

  1. Revise the class group agreement.

  2. ⚠️Trigger warning Say:

“This lesson covers topics that some students may find distressing. Please let me know if you feel you need to take a break.”

Introduction: True or False Quiz

  1. Focus students on the topic of blood-borne viruses with a True or False Quiz. See Teacher resource: Blood-borne virus quiz and answer sheet. Students do not have to reveal their scores.

Laugh and learn video - blood-borne virus safety

  1. Watch the Laugh and learn video - blood-borne virus safety (1min 46sec).

  1. laugh Ask:
  • What do you think of the use of humour in this video?

  • Does it help get information across?

  • What is the message/information you got from this video?

  1. Divide the class into groups of 4. Each group will need access to the website getthefacts.health.wa.gov.au/bloodsafe as a reliable source of information for the activity. 

  2. laugh Ask:

  • Why do you think you have been given this website Get the Facts and not asked to search for your own information? 

Anyone can write anything online and when looking for health information it is important to check who is writing material and that it comes from a reliable and credible source and is up to date and relevant to Western Australia (as laws, services, etc can differ from state to state and country to country). The Get the Facts website is written by WA Department of Health and aims to provide accurate and reliable information on sexual health, blood-borne viruses and relationships for young people in Western Australia. Its specific target group is 13-17 year old people. It is regularly updated to maintain current information. 

  1. Provide access to the Blood Aware animation for the whole class. This click through animation should take approximately 2-3 minutes to read.

  2. laugh Ask:

  • What new piece of information did you learn from that animation?

Blood cannot enter the body through the skin.

Blood can carry viruses such as HIV and hep C.

Blood can only enter the body through a break in the skin or lining of the mouth, vagina, penis or anus.

Once inside the break in the skin, it can mix with the blood and may result in the transfer of a virus.

The ways that you can come into contact with someone else's blood include: unsafe injecting drug use; unsterile tattooing equipment; not using condoms when having sex; sharing razors and toothbrushes; needlestick injury; unsterile body piercing. 

Blood particles can be too small to see without magnification (so you may not see the blood)

Virus present + body fluid (e.g. blood) + activity (e.g. unsterile body piercing) + point of entry (e.g. broken skin) = risk.

yes Teaching tip: Blood can also carry the hep B virus. Some BBVs (HIV and hep b) are also transmitted through other body fluids (semen and vaginal fluids) which is also why condoms need to be used. People can come into contact with someone else's blood in other ways such as sporting injuries which is why it is important to let an adult know if someone is bleeding, following the sports blood rule and appropriate first aid procedures.

Group research

  1. Give each group 10 minutes to research answers to one of the following questions on getthefacts.health.wa.gov.au/blood-safe/bbvs. Ask each group to write what they think are the 5 most important pieces of information that all people should know about their topic. 
  • What are BBVs - hep B?

  • What are BBVs - hep C?

  • What are BBVs - HIV/AIDS?

  • How can BBVs be spread? Unprotected sex

  • How can BBVs be spread? Body piercings

  • How can BBVs be spread? Body tattoos

  • How can BBVs be spread? Injecting drug use

  • How can BBVs be prevented?

  1. Each group to report their findings to the whole class. Suggestions for ways students can report back:
  • Complete student activity sheet to be combined into a display about being Blood Aware (See example Teacher resource: BBV safety_example of display).

  • Complete student activity sheet electronically to create combined interactive whiteboard display or infographic using web tools such as Tableau, Mysimpleshow, etc.

  • Create 20-30 second radio adverts they can record and play back to class. This must get the 5 clear messages across and appeal to a target audience (e.g. young people).

  • Create an Instagram post.

  1. Allow students to ask student presenters questions of the information presented to clarify points.

3-2-1 Reflection

  1. 3-2-1 Reflect - ask students to individually complete the following (on the board/on a sheet/verbally).
  • 3 things I learnt

  • 2 things I found interesting

  • 1 question I have

  1. Students share information with a partner or in a small group. Ask for volunteers to share their responses. Ensure that questions are answered or that students feel confident that they can find the answer to their question or collect questions that need to be answered at a later date in a question box. (For tips on how to set up a question box see Essential information: Question box).

  2. laugh Say:

"Thinking about your score on the quiz at the beginning of the lesson, do you think your score would change if you took the quiz now? Why?"

Take home message

  1. Remind students of the take home message:

enlightened BBVs can be transmitted through blood to blood contact and by body fluids such as semen and vaginal fluids.

enlightened BBVs often don't have symptoms for many years which means many people don't realise they have a BBV.

enlightened If left untreated, BBVs can cause serious long term health problems.

enlightened BBVs are easily preventable - use a condom when having sex; don't share needles; get piercing/tattoos from reputable places that use safe blood practices; have vaccinations (hep B). 

enlightened If a person has a BBV, it can be easily managed and treated and some can be cured.

enlightened Be blood aware.

Health promoting schools strategies

Backgroud teacher note: Health promoting schools framework.

Partnerships with parents

Partnerships with school staff

  • Collaborate with the Science teachers to look at how different viruses are transmitted.

  • Collaborate with the Humanities and Social Sciences teachers to look at the history of BBV knowledge and understanding (e.g The history of virology - pioneer scientists, vaccinations, viruses).

Environment

Keeping safe in sexual situations


Year level: 9 or 10

Description

Explores the importance of communicating with a partner about readiness for sex, consent and contraception.

Learning Focus

Being healthy safe and active

Year 9: Skills to deal with challenging or unsafe situations: refusal skills; initiating contingency plans; expressing thoughts, opinins and beliefs; acting assertively (ACPPS091).

Year 9: Actions and strategies to enhance health and wellbeing ina range of environments: identifying and managing risky situations; safe blood practices (ACPPS091).

Year 9: Impact of external influences on the ability of adolescents to make healthy and safe choices relating to: sexuality; alcohol and drug use; risk taking (ACPPS092).

Year 10: Skills and strategies to manage situations where risk is encouraged by others (ACPPS091).

Year 10: External influences on sexuality and sexual behaviours, including the impact decisions and actions have on their own and others' health and wellbeing (ACPPS091).

Communicating and interacting for health and wellbeing

Year 9: Characteristics of respectful relationships (ACPPS093)

Year 10: Skills and strategies to promote respectful relationships (ACPPS093)

Key Understandings

enlightened Communicating with your partner about readiness for sex, consent and contraception is essential.

Materials

  • Laugh and learn video - keeping safe (2min 8sec)
  • Computer and internet access
  • Student activity sheet: Lots to think about keeping safe for sexual activity - 1 per group of 4 students (enlarged to A3 size)
  • SARC school posters (see links within activity section) - hardcopies can be ordered prior to lesson, pdfs can be printed off, or displayed electronically

General Capabilities

No General Capabilities values have been selected.

No Australian Curriculum values have been selected.

Blooms Revised Taxonomy

No Blooms values have been selected.

Inquiry Learning Phase

No Inquiry Learning phase values have been selected.


Teaching and Learning Activities

Before you get started

          http://www.kemh.health.wa.gov.au/~/media/Files/Hospitals/WNHS/Our Services/State-wide Services/SARC/Resources/P_kids.pdf

                                        

Group agreement

yesTeaching tip: A group agreement must be established before any RSE program begins to ensure a safe learning environment. Read: Essential information: Establishing a group agreement for tips on how to create one and what to include.

  1. Revise the class group agreement

Laugh and learn video - safer sex

  1. laugh Say:

"In this video there are some words and phrases that need some thinking about and discussing before we get to see the video."

  1. laugh Divide the class into groups to discuss the following questions (approximately 5 minutes)
  • What do you think 'ramification' means? Use a dictionary if you don't know. 

Consequence, result, aftermath, outcome, effect.

  • Thinking about the topic of 'staying safe in a sexual situation' - what do you think would be covered in a 'proper talk'?

Communicating about individual wants.

  • What do you understand 'safe sex' measures to be? 

Using a condom to preven STIs and/or pregnancy and using a contraceptive method to prevent pregnancy.

  1. Ask for responses from each group.

  2. laugh Explain:

"The tersm 'safe' and 'safer' are often used interchangeably. In this video the term 'safe' is used, however, the more accurate term is 'safer' as no sexual activity is 100% safe."

For a more detailed explanation see What is safer sex? (external link) and Safer sex (external link). 

  1. ⚠️Trigger warning Say:

"This lesson covers topics that some students might find distressing. Please let me know if you feel you need to take a break."

yes Teaching Tip: You may wish to offer students the option of asking to use the toilet or have a non-verbal signal that students can use so that they can take a break without having to identify themselves to the class.

  1. Watch Laugh and learn - keeping safe (2min 8sec)

  1. laugh Ask:
  • What do you think of the use of humour in this video?

  • Does it help get information across?

  • What is the message/information you got from this video?

  1. laugh Say:

"While humour is useful and we can laught at some aspects there is a serious side to keeping safe that we need to look at. We're going to look at some of the possible 'ramifications' (consequences) of sexual actvitiy."

"There were a number of positive key words you may have seen or heard in the video. What were they?" (Give clues by writig these words with some letters missing.)

  • communicate/communication/talk

  • consent 

  • comfort/comfortable

  • conversation

  • wants/expectations

"So why is it important to talk about safe sex beforehand?"

Ready, comfortable, can be difficult because it is out of comfort zone. Both need to be aware of each others expectations.

Placemat: Keeping safe with sexual activity

  1. laugh Say:

"There are several aspects to keeping safe in sexual situations that need to be considered.

  • sexual/physical safety

  • emotional safety

  • social safety (reputation)

  • respectful relationships

  • legal issues"

  1. As a whole group, revise the legal aspects of consent in WA - Ready, willing and able. 

Teaching tip: For essential information about consent, safer sex and taking selfies go to Sexual health and youth (external site) and Sex and the law (external site). 

  1. Placemat activity

In groups of 4 students complete Student activity sheet: Keeping safe with sexual activity. Each group discuss and record possible issues and ramifications associated with keeping safe:

  • sexual/physical safety

  • social safety (reputation)

  • emotional safety

  • respectful relationships

  • legal issues.

  1. Groups share ideas with the whole class.

  2. Remind students that SARC is the place to contact for anyone who may have been sexually assaulted.

  3. Display SARC's website and phone number 6458 1828 or free call 1800 199 888. Posters can be put up in class and other places around the school. 

Reflection

  1. Ask students to write one new thing they have learnt from this lesson. Ask for volunteers to share what they wrote.

Take home message

  1. Remind students of the take home message:

enlightened Keeping safe means a lot more than preventing STIs and pregnancy. I need to think and talk about how I can look after my own and my partner's physical, social and legal safety beore having sex.

Take home activity

  1. Remind students that Get the Facts has a completely confidential 'ask a question' service that they may wish to use. All questions are answerd by a qualified health professional with a week. 

  2. Provide students with the Student fact sheet: Reliable RSE websites to take home. Remind them that it is best to use credible Western Australian and Australian websites to answer health questions rather than doing an internet search. 

Health promoting schools strategies

Backgroud teacher note: Health promoting schools framework

 

Partnership with parents

Share the following links with parents and students via your newsletters, social media and websites:

Consent

Respectful relationships

Sexual assault

Staying safe

Help seeking

 

Partnerships with staff

Encourage all staff members to complete these online courses:

Safer sex - condoms


Year level: 9 or 10

Description

Develop an understanding of the term 'safer sex' and the importance of using condoms to prevent STIs and pregnancies.

Learning Focus

Being healthy, safe and active

Year 9: Skills to deal with challenging or unsafe situations: refusal skills; initiating contingency plans; expressing thoughts, opinions, beliefs; acting assertively (ACPPS090).

Year 10: Skills and strategies to manage situations where risk is encourged by others (ACPPS091).

Year 10: External influences on sexuality and sexual health behaviours, including the impact decisions and actions have on their own and others' health and wellbeing (ACPPS092).

Communicating and interacting for health and wellbeing

Year 9: Characteristics of respectful relationships: respecting the rights and responsibilities of individuals in the relationship; respect for personal differences and opinions; empathy (ACCPS093).

Year 10: Skills and strategies to promote respectful relationships, such as: appropriate emotional responses in a variety of situations; taking action if a relationship is not respectful (ACCPS093)

Key Understandings

enlightened 'Safer sex' means using a condom to prevent STIs and unintended pregnancies.

enlightened Being able communicate with your partner about using condoms is part of a respectful sexual relationship.

Materials

  • Access to internet
  • Laugh and learn video - condoms (2min 23sec)
  • Teaching resource: life skills (1 per pair) - electronic or hard copy

General Capabilities

No General Capabilities values have been selected.

Health and physical education(P)

Relationships and sexuality

Blooms Revised Taxonomy

No Blooms values have been selected.

Inquiry Learning Phase

No Inquiry Learning phase values have been selected.


Teaching and Learning Activities

Before you get started

Group agreement

yes Teaching tip: A group agreement must be established before any RSE program begins to ensure a safe learning environment. Read Essential information: Establishing a group agreement for tips on how to create one and what to include.

  1. Revise the class group agreement.

  2. ⚠️Trigger warning Say:

“This lesson covers topics that some students may find distressing. Please let me know if you feel you need to take a break.”

Introduction

  1. Using the One minute challenge teaching strategy students complete this sentence, “To me, safe sex is……..”.
  1. Share in small groups.
  1. Ask for volunteers to share with the class. (Some of the answers may be humorous and that’s ok!)
  1. laugh Say:

“What we will be covering in this session may not be new to many of you. But I am sure that you will all find at least one new and different piece of information – if not more! Everyone needs reminders at different times about keeping ourselves and others safer.”

  1. laugh Explain:

"The terms ‘safe’ and ‘safer’ are often used interchangeably. In this video the term ‘safe’ is used however the more accurate term is ‘safer’ as no sexual activity is 100% safe."

For more detailed explanation see What is safer sex? (external link) and Get the Facts - Safer sex

Laugh and learn video - condoms

  1. Watch Laugh and learn video - condoms (2min 23sec).

  1. laugh Ask the following questions:
  • Why do you think humour is used in this video?

(e.g. negotiating condom use can be difficult and embarrassing; lots of people have negative thoughts and myths about condoms; sex can be embarrassing and people use humour to cope with their embarrassment and/or lack of knowledge)

  • Does it help get information across? How?
  • What is the main message/information you got from this video?
  • Seriously, what is 'safer sex'?

(Using a condom (male or female condom) to reduce the risk of STIs and pregnancy.)

  • Remember the safest sex is no sex at all!

Survey stastics

  1. laugh Say:

“Some of you may have already had some sessions in the past about condoms. Today we are going to revise that and also look at some other issues associated with condom use and safer sex.”

  1. laugh Ask:

“Who thinks that 100% of young people know that using condoms reduces the risk of unplanned pregnancies and STIs?

In 2018, what percentage of Australian Year 10 – 12 students do you think say they always use condoms? Take some answers. (38%)

And what % said they often used them? Take some answers. (24%)

If most people know that it is important to use condoms, why do you think that 62% of those students surveyed said they didn’t always use them?

(e.g. Too embarrassed; condom not readily available when required; partner didn’t want to use; didn’t think about it; didn’t think they would have sex at that moment; not prepared; I don’t like them; my partner doesn’t like them; I trust my partner; we’ve both been tested; I know my partner’s sexual history; it’s not my responsibility; we both haven't had any sexual activity with anyone else before.)"

(Reference: National Survey of Secondary Students and Sexual Health)

Attitudes and values

  1. laugh Say:

"It’s important to understand that knowledge alone isn’t always enough for people to make the safest or healthiest choices. They need to believe that the behaviour is really important and they need to value the outcome – whether that is not getting an STI or having an unplanned pregnancy.

And then people need specific skills to be able to put into practice their knowledge and attitudes and values.

So, Knowledge + Attitudes/Values + Skills (might) = Healthier/safer behaviour."

  1. laugh Say:

"Let’s think about using a condom.

We already know that you have lots of knowledge about how to use condoms and why they should be used.

Let’s look at attitudes and values.

Working in pairs make a list of attitudes and values, beliefs, feelings and opinions that might underlie why some people (especially young people) may choose to use or not use condoms.

People value__________ so might use condoms

People value __________ so might NOT use condoms

not getting an STI their reputation ('slut' vs 'stud') (they worry about being judged for having condoms)
not getting pregnant

their relationship (partner does not want to use a condom)

not getting someone pregnant pleasure (Some people think that sex with a condom is less pleasurable however there are many ways to have pleasurable sex with condoms. Protecting your sexual health and the health of your partner by using condoms helps you to relax and have safe and pleasurable sex)
their lifestyle (i.e. raising a child has financial and time commitments for 18+ years) what other people think of them (e.g. embarrassment buying condoms)
their reputation religion/culture (e.g. using condoms is against their religion; having sex before marriage is against their culture but they want to have sex and take the risk rather than being caught buying/carrying condoms
their relationship monogamy - having one sexual partner (Things to consider: How can I be sure I am in a monogamous relationship? How can I be sure my partner doesn't have an STI? How can I be sure I don't have an STI? How do we prevent unwanted pregnancies?)
their health family (e.g. they may want to have a baby)
keeping themselves safe that there is no/low risk of pregnancy (e.g. they may be in a same-sex relationship or using other contraceptives. Things to consider: how do I protect myself and my partner against STIs?)
keeping their partner safe  
convenience (i.e. people don't need to go to the doctor to get condoms, unlike other contraception)  
peace of mind  
pleasure (i.e. they are not able to enjoy sex if they don't feel safe/protected from risk)  

 

yes Teaching tips: It is important to consider diversity of sexual identity and sexual behaviours when discussing things such as condom use. Some people may have sexual experiences with people of the same sex and not identify as lesbian, gay or bisexual.

Some STIs can be passed on through oral sex. External condoms (sometimes referred to as male condoms) can reduce the risk of STI transmission during oral sex. Dental dams (external link) can also be used. This is a piece of latex (or polyurethane) that can used between the mouth and vagina or mouth and anus during oral sex.

Internal condoms (sometimes referred to as female condoms) are another contraceptive that prevents both STIs and unintended pregnancy.

  1. Discuss as a whole group. (Note that valuing their reputation and their relationship can be reasons to choose to use or not use condoms.) Point out that different people have different values and individuals have values that may change depending on their stage of life.

Life skills

  1. laugh Say:

“Just because people have knowledge about the correct way to use a condom, and they think that it is important to use condoms, people still need a variety of skills in order to use condoms properly, consistently and respectfully.”

  1. Display Teaching resource: Life skills_Student activity sheet or provide as a handout for students to complete (1 per pair).
  1. Working in pairs, ask students to suggest examples of the life skills being practised when negotiating condom use and using condoms. See Teaching resource: Life skills - answers sheet for possible answers.
  1. Ask for volunteers to give their examples.

Reflection

  1. laugh Ask for volunteers to respond to the question:

“What skill is the most important to you and why?”

  1. Remind students that Get the Facts has a completely confidential ‘ask a question’ service that they may wish to use. All questions are answered by a qualified health professional within a week.

Take home message

  1. Remind students of the take home message:

enlightened To encourage better (and more) use of condoms we need:

  • knowledge about how and why to use condoms

  • positive attitudes and values towards using condoms

  • life skills, including being able to communicate with a partner about having safer sex.

Assessment task

An assessment task is linked to this lesson and video - Safer sex quiz questions.

External links

Health promoting schools framework

Backgroud teacher note: Health promoting schools framework.

Partnerships with parents

  • Talk soon. Talk often: a guide for parents talking to their kids about sex is a free resource that can be bulk ordered by schools.  Send a copy home to parents prior to starting your RSE program. The booklet offers age and stage appropriate information so that parents can reinforce the topics covered in class. (How to order hardcopies.)

  • Run a parent workshop prior to delivering RSE lessons so that parents can see the resources used, ask questions and find out how to support the school program by continuing conversations at home.

  • Add the Get the Facts and SECCA app links to your website/e-news for parents.

Partnerships with school staff

  • Invite the school health professionals and pastoral care staff (school nurse, school pyschologist, chaplain, boarding house master, etc) to a class or an assembly to introduce them to the students and let them know what their roles are and how they can help the students. For example:

    • If you have concerns about relationships, you can go to...

    • If you have more questions about sexual health, you can go to...

 

 

 

Puberty part 1


Year level: 7 or 8

Description

Students explore the physical, emotional and social changes associated with puberty.

Learning Focus

Being healthy, safe and active

Year 7: Management of emotional and social changes associated with puberty through the use of: coping skills; communication skills; problem solving skills and strategies (ACCPS071).

Year 8: The impact of physical changes on gender, cultural and sexual identities (ACPPS070).

Key Understandings

enlightened Puberty is the period of time when your body changes from a child to an adult.

enlightened There is a wide range of 'normal' when it comes to the physical changes of puberty.

enlightened Puberty positivity - it's not something to be scared of!

Materials

  • Access to internet
  • Laugh and Learn video - puberty part 1 (2min 44sec)
  • Preferred media for large and small group work and individual work (e.g. paper and textas, or ipads/tablets)
  • Sticky notes/post-it notes
  • A4 coloured card or paper

General Capabilities

No General Capabilities values have been selected.

Health and physical education(P)

Relationships and sexuality

Blooms Revised Taxonomy

No Blooms values have been selected.

Inquiry Learning Phase

No Inquiry Learning phase values have been selected.


Teaching and Learning Activities

Before you get started

Group agreement

yes Teaching tip: A group agreement must be established before any RSE program begins to ensure a safe learning environment. Read: Essential information: Establishing a group agreement for tips on how to create one and what to include.

  1. Revise the class group agreement

Introduction: Brainstorm

  1. Remind students that many of them have probably covered puberty in Years 5 and 6, but there may also be some students who have missed out on formal lessons about puberty. This lesson aims to revise and extend their knowledge.

  1. laugh Say:

 “During this session I want you to think about what you wish you had known about puberty even a year or two ago. What do you think would make it easier for you to deal with the changes of puberty? You may also have young people around you who are asking you questions about puberty. This session can help you to be sure that information that you may want to share will be accurate.”

  1. Brainstorm - Write at least 5 single words (adjectives) that describes how someone might feel about puberty. (Recording options: sitcky notes; wordcloud makers; Mentimeter - wordcloud

  2. Ask for words and record the number of students who have written the same word. Rank and discuss the most common words.

E.g wordcloud creates an image where the most common word is largest.

  1. laugh Ask:

  • Why do you think these words might be the most common?

  • Are they generally positive, negative or neutral words?

Laugh and learn - puberty part 1 video

  1. Watch Laugh and learn video - puberty part 1 video (2 min 44 sec)

  1. laugh Ask the following questions:

  • What do you think of the use of humour in this video?

  • Does it help get the information across?

  • What is the message/information you took from this video?

Puberty myths and facts

  1. In pairs, on sticky notes, write two myths that students have heard about puberty or that they heard in the video.

  2. With the whole class, facilitate grouping these into same/similar myths into a T-chart (labelled 'myths' and 'facts'). See which myths are most common.

  3. Work through each myth and ask students if they can provide a fact to dispel each myth. See the table below for possible answers. Discuss the corresponding facts addressing any misconceptions, and record on the T-chart.  

Myth Fact
You 'catch' puberty Puberty happens to most people. It's not contagious like an infection or disease. You can't 'catch it.
Puberty happens overnight. Puberty takes time.
Puberty happens at the same time for everyone. Generally puberty starts somewhere between 9 and 15 years.
Puberty is scary! Puberty doesn't have to be scary or something to worry about. In some cultures and families it is a time of celebration.
etc  

Background teacher notes: Puberty and Menstrual cycle provide teachers with additional professional reading.

Students can use the following free resources as references if required:

           How to order free hardcopies.

  1. Students nominate two myths they wish to work with (make sure all myths are covered). In pairs, write one myth on one side of their A4 coloured card and illustrate with a cartoon. On the other side, write the corresponding fact. Repeat with the other myth. (This activity could also be completed on electronic media.)

  2. Share with whole class.

Optional activity: Sharing

  1. Compile into a book titled Myths and facts about puberty.

  2. Depending on class/school demographics (and with suitable teacher support and supervision), there may be opportunities for some students to share the book with other classes. Alternatively, the books can be given to teachers to share with younger students.

3-2-1 Reflection

  1. 3-2-1 Reflection - Students write on a prepared worksheet or in a journal:
  • 3 x recalls: state three facts about puberty 

  • 2 x so what's: write two things about why this information is relevant and important

  • 1 x questions: write one qustion. For example:

    • Why is it that...?

    • In the future, what will....?

    • How does this affect...?

Take home message

  1. Remind students of the take home message/s:

enlightened Puberty positivity - it's not something you 'catch' and not something to be scared of!

enlightenedPuberty happens to most people and is a normal part of growing up and developing from a child to an adult.

  1. Remind students that Get the Facts has a completely confidential 'Ask a question' service that they may wish to use. All questions are answered by a qualified health professional within a week. 

Health promoting schools strategies

Backgroud teacher note: Health promoting schools framework

Partnerships with parents

Partnerships with school staff

  • Invite the school health professionals and pastoral care staff (school nurse, school pyschologist, chaplain, boarding house master, etc) to a class or an assembly to introduce them to the students and let them know what their roles are and how they can help the students. For example:

    • If you get your period at school, you can go to...

    • If you are worried about something and need to talk, you can go to...

Quiz

This strategy will help students to:

• recall prior knowledge and identify future learning needs.

Implementation

  1. Students or the teacher devise a set of quiz questions related to the health or safety topic.

  2. Students individually complete the quiz then discuss the questions as a class.

  3. Use the questions that students had difficulty answering to guide the selection of further learning experiences.

Variation

For True/False oral quizes, students can indicate answers with thumbs up, thumbs down and thumbs sideways (unsure of answer). This allows students to contribute without the pressure of having to write answers. It also allows for a very quick, informal assessment and allows you to identify students who might require extra support within the lesson or for the next lesson.

 

thumbs up and down.jpg (Version 1.0)

Thumbnail
Preview

Top tips from Talk soon. Talk often. - FREE

Top 20 tips for talking to kids about relationships and sexuality and the top 10 reasons why we must talk soon and often. An A4 flyer that outlines the tips included in the Talk soon. Talk often book on page 10-11 and 76-77. 

Agency: Department of Health

Year of publication: 2019

Where to get a hard copy:

For free bulk ofers (only available to WA addresses)

Free bulk orders can be made via www.dohquickmail.com.au. Please register with an organisational email (gmail and hotmail are not accepted through this automated system). 

If you have any problems with the online ordering system, please contact SHBBVP@health.wa.gov.au.

For individual copies

For individual copies, please contact Sharelle Tulloh on 9222 4447 or sharelle.tulloh@health.wa.gov.au OR administration at SHBBVP@health.wa.gov.au.

 

Suggestions for use:

  • as a precursor to sending out the full Talk soon. Talk often book to parents

  • as a reminder of the key messages from the book when you begin your RSE program

  • as a display in the staffroom

  • as a quick guide for parents

  • as a link in newsletters, on social media or websites.

Where to download: https://gdhr.wa.gov.au/documents/10184/486309/13656-talk-soon-talk-often-top-tips.pdf/7b7580c7-c2b6-8a41-d95b-aea5882c072c?t=1572576195560



Teaching strategies

The strategies described in this site represent well-recognised and effective teaching practices that promote critical and reflective thinking, research, evaluation and collaborative learning and focus on literacy. The strategies have been designed to accommodate differences in learning styles and reflect contemporary learning theory including Gardner's Multiple Intelligence theory and the revised Bloom's Taxonomy.

The classroom strategies have been further divided according to the basic elements of an inquiry process. These elements are also fundamental to the decision making processes in the Health and Physical Education strand: Personal, social and community health. This strategies section focus' on the following:

  • Tuning in: These strategies can be used to determine students' current knowledge, skills and attitudes prior to planning a program. They will engage and focus students in the learning experiences and content.

  • Grouping strategies: These strategies allow students to be grouped in interesting and interactive ways to encourage them to work with a variety of class members.

  • Finding out: These strategies encourage investigation and independent learning about key health and safety concepts.

  • Sorting out: These strategies encourage the analysis, organisation, review and reflection of information.

  • Developing values: Thsee strategies allow students to identify, discuss and develop positive attitudes towards safer and healthier lifestyles.

  • Making decisions: These strategies provide opportunities for students to develop decision-making skills to enable them to make safer and healthier choices.

  • Speaking out: These strategies provide opportunities for students to develop the communication and negotiation skills required for safer healthier lifestyles.

  • Reflecting: These strategies allow students to identify, discuss and consider the changes in their understandings, attitudes and values.

Acknowledgement:

A special thank you to the School Drug Education and Road Aware (SDERA) Program for permitting the use of these strategies which have been adapted from the Challenges and Choices resource.

Government of Western Australia (2007). Challenges and choices. School Drug Education and Road Aware, Western Australia

Grouping strategies

Purpose

  • to group students in interactive and interesting ways for activities

  • to encourage students to work with a variety of people

  • to develop verbal and non-verbal communication skills

  • to develop problem solving skills

 

Some grouping strategies can be used to revise cross curricular content (e.g. number bonds to 10)

See the left hand panel for list of different ways to group your students.


Year level: 9

Description

Students use a decision mapping process to explore situations where people might be asked to send a sext. Emotional, social, ethical and legal consequences of sending or not sending a sext are unpacked. Recent WA image-based abuse laws and where to go for help are also covered.

Learning Focus

Identifying strategies to reduce the emotional and social impact associated with communicating through mobile phones.

Key Understandings

  • There are many advantages and disadvantages of communicating through mobile phones.

  • Understanding the potential social and legal consequences of sexting. 

  • Strategies can be used to reduce the risk of your own and others' emotional and social wellbeing.

Materials

  • Student Activity Sheet: Make cyberspace a better place - What do you think? [one set of A3 sheets]
  • Student Activity Sheet: What would I do? [one per student]
  • Internet access

General Capabilities

No General Capabilities values have been selected.

Health and physical education(P)

Personal, social and community health

This strand will develop students' knowledge, understanding and skills to support a positive sense of self, to effectively respond to life events and transitions and to engage in their learning. Effective communication, decision-making and goal-setting skills are integral to this strand as they help to establish and maintain relationships in family, school, peer group and community settings, support healthy and safer behaviours, and enable advocacy. Students will source and examine a range of health information, products, services and policies, and evaluate their impact on individual and community health and safety.

Safety

Blooms Revised Taxonomy

No Blooms values have been selected.

Inquiry Learning Phase

No Inquiry Learning phase values have been selected.

Related Items

Teaching Resource (download) Guides FAQs

Teaching and Learning Activities

Before you get started

  • Communicating sexually online or with a mobile phone is increasingly accessible and socially acceptable for young people today. 82% of Australian teenagers aged 14 - 17 years see the internet as very important in their lives and 72% go online more than once a day. While entertainment is the most popular online activity, 62% use it for communication. Blogging and online community activites via mobile phones increased significantly in the period from 2009-2013, surpassing the proportion of teenagers performing these activities using a computer. (Australian Communications and Media Authority. Aussie teens and kids online. Accessed 7 July 2016).

  • It is important that the positive aspects of online communication (such as influencing social development, maintaining long distant relationships with family and friends, forming relationships with like-minded people, documenting events and raising awareness of important issues) are highlighted as strongly as the potential issues.

  • The most important lesson for young people is that they learn to be responsible with mobile technology and know how to use it safely. Refer to the Social Media: Sexting Guide for further information.

  • It is possible that a student has been involved in a traumatic experience relating to sexting. Teachers should be familiar with the Guide: Dealing with disclosures and have a risk management strategy in place.

Whole Class

Students develop an understanding of what sexting is and how it can impact on people socially and emotionally.

  1. Ask students to listen as you read out each of the following facts and to stand up if they think they know what concept or term you are referring to.

  • Partners in committed, existing relationships are more likely to do this but not everyone does it.

  • You really need to trust and respect the person you do this with and give consent for it to occur. If it happens without your consent it is a breach of trust and may potentially exploit others. 

  • 50% of all 13-18 year olds have done this. 

  • Can impact on a person socially, emotionally and legally.

  • Usually involved mobile phones but can involve computers.

  • Once it is done it usually leaves a permanent digital record. 

  • The greatest motivation for this happening is that it is fun and flirty.

  • It can be illegal if it involves a person younger than 18.

  • Is the exchange of 'sexy' photos and messages.

  1. Once the majority of the class has stood up, ask a random selection to name what it was you were referring to: Sexting. Young people do not typically use the term 'sexting', so may instead use the terms 'naked selfies', 'nudies' or 'banana pics'.

  2. Clarify that ‘sexting’ or sending ‘sext messages’ is when nude and/or sexually explicit images are taken on a mobile phone, tablet, web-cam or other device. Sexting is the 'digital recording of nude or sexually suggestive or explicit images and their distribution by mobile phone messaging or through social networking'. (Australian Institute of Criminology, Sexting among young people: Perceptions and Practice. Accessed 7 July 2016). The term 'sexually explicit' can mean different things to different people, but is generally described as  an image designed to initiate sexual excitement for the person receiving the image. 

  3. Discuss the fact that in Western Australia, it is against the law to take, look at, keep or send sexually explicit photos or images of someone under the age of 18. Laws around sexting mean that young people have been charged by police with child pornography offences. If charged, a person could be listed as a sex offender on the Australian National Child Offender Register.

  4. Watch the YouTube clip Make Cyberspace a Better Place - Amy - Sexting (https://youtu.be/BOWQf81Aon8?list=UUEFrX1hl8tOBLUQ4aVwFS5A) [2:12min].

    • Ask students to reflect silently on the clip.

Independent or Small Group

Students explore the consequences of sexting on self and others.

  1. After viewing the Make Cyberspace a Better Place YouTube clip, place students in seven groups and give each group one of the A3 printed Student Activity Sheets: Make cyberspace a better place - What do you think?. Ask students to respond to the questions in their groups with one person scribing everyone's responses in the space around each question. 

  • Each group has two minutes to write their responses after which they will pass their sheet to the next group.

  • If a group sees a response already written that they agree with, ask them to place a 'tick' next to that response.

  • After each group has had a turn, ask for a spokesperson from each group to summarise the responses for each question they have in front of them. Possible responses are listed below. 

What are some risks that Amy took when she sent the naked photos? (the photos could be forwarded to people she knows or doesn't know; the photos may be posted online; she may be bullied online or in person; If reported, she may have been charged with a criminal offence for taking the photos and sending the photos to someone under 18 years old)

Why do you think Patrick forwarded the photos? (because it's fun; to be flirty; to be cool; peer pressure; to embarrass or hurt Amy; because he received one)

What do you think Patrick should have done with the naked photos? (deleted the images and not forwarded them to others)

If Amy was your friend, what would you do? (suggest she talks to a trusted adult about the situation; delete any images you have received; help to hunt down the images and remove them from social networking sites)

If Patrick was your friend and he sent you these images of Amy, what advice would you give him? (Inform Patrick that you don't want to receive photos like these; If the texts keep coming, block Patrick's phone number and unfriend him from your social networking account)  

How might this experience affect Amy in the future? (It may affect her self-esteem; she may have distrust of other people which may affect her future friendships and relationships; the photos may be posted online which could damage her reputation; if the police become involved, it could result in penalties)

How might this experience affect Patrick in the future? (Trust may be affected in his future relationships; his friends may distance themselves from him; if the police become involved it could result in penalties).

  1. Reflective question: Ask the class what they would do if they received a naked photo of one of their friends. How would it make them feel? Would it change the way that they view their friend? What do you think the person sending the photo would want you to do with it?

  • Explain to the class that sometimes people will receive sexual images from someone without asking for it or even wanting it. If a person receives an unsolicited image then they should delete it and tell a trusted adult. It is never okay for people to send you images that make you feel uncomfortable.

Additional activity: Have students complete the Student Activity Sheet: What would I do? individuallyAfter students have answered the questions, provide them with possible answers from the teacher answer sheet. Explain the suggested answers may not be the best answers for everyone and it will depend on the person and the situation but they do provide some simple tips for dealing with the possible effects of sexting.

Reflection

  1. Discuss trusted sources/people in a young person's life who could provide support if needed, e.g. family members, school staff.

  2. Show the students recommended websites and resources that can provide young people with more information and further support (e.g. Kids Helpline, esafety website, Think U Know).

  3. Finish the lesson with the short YouTube clip Alarmed [0:54 min]. Remind students that while sending photos of themselves or others not fully dressed may seem like harmless fun, once sent, they become part of their or their friend's digital footprint and this lasts forever.

  4. The key message of Alarmed is: Your nightmare could become your reality if sexts get around school. Stay smart and keep your private parts private! 

  • Ask students to individually design their own slogan/key message about sexting to add to a class PowerPoint (slides can be printed off as a class display).

External related resources

The Office of eSafety Commissioner website offers:

Body image


Year level: 9

Description

Students analyse how beauty is represented in the media through music and magazines and the impact this, and the perceptions of others, have on personal identities.

Learning Focus

Our identities are influenced by how beauty is represented in the media and how other people perceive us.

Key Understandings

  • Beauty can be stereotyped in the media for both males and females.

  • Media, and other people's perceptions, can influence personal identities.

Materials

  • Butcher's paper [6 pieces]
  • Old magazines and/or newspapers
  • A5 coloured paper
  • Internet access

General Capabilities

No General Capabilities values have been selected.

Health and physical education(P)

Personal, social and community health

This strand will develop students' knowledge, understanding and skills to support a positive sense of self, to effectively respond to life events and transitions and to engage in their learning. Effective communication, decision-making and goal-setting skills are integral to this strand as they help to establish and maintain relationships in family, school, peer group and community settings, support healthy and safer behaviours, and enable advocacy. Students will source and examine a range of health information, products, services and policies, and evaluate their impact on individual and community health and safety.

Mental health and wellbeing

Blooms Revised Taxonomy

No Blooms values have been selected.

Inquiry Learning Phase

No Inquiry Learning phase values have been selected.

Related Items

Guides

Teaching and Learning Activities

Before you get started

  • With so many physical and emotional changes occurring during puberty, it is normal for young people to be more self-aware during this time. In Mission Australia's Youth Survey 20181 30.4% of young people are concerned about body image, and research suggests that less than a quarter of Australian girls and a third of Australian boys are satisfied with their weight2. See the Guide: Body image for more information.

  • It is important to highlight the differences between beauty represented in the media and real life. This activity provides an opportunity to discuss and support students' confidence and self-esteem. Establish ground rules so students feel safe and respected during classroom activities.

Whole Class

Students explore their own perspectives and the perspectives of other students regarding beauty and concepts that relate to beauty.

  1. Attach 6 pieces of butcher's paper to the walls of the classroom. Label each piece of butcher's paper with one of the following titles: beautiful, sexy, ugly, handsome, creative, helpful.

  2. Allocate a small group of students to each piece of paper.

  3. Give students 2 minutes to write things that come to mind when they think of the word that is on their piece of butcher's paper. It might be other adjectives or it might be celebrities. Ensure they do not write names of people they know personally (e.g. other people at school).

  4. Move the groups to the next gallery walk to the right and repeat the process until each group has written on each of the pieces of butcher's paper.

  5. As a whole group discuss what the class has written for each concept.

  • Discuss similarities and differences.

Independent or Small Group

Students develop an understanding of natural beauty and use music and magazines to assist them. Students also explore the impact of the media on own perspectives of beauty.

  1. Watch 'Try' by Colbie Caillat on YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GXoZLPSw8U8) [3:51min]

  2. Ask students what their thoughts and feelings were after seeing the clip.

    • What is the key message of the song?

  1. Give students old magazines/newspapers.

    • Students are to explore the magazines/newspapers for what they perceive to be natural beauty.

  1. Discuss with the students as a whole group what they perceive natural beauty to be and what assumptions do we make from how someone looks. What impact does the media have on our perceptions of what beauty is and how we perceive ourselves?

  2. Ask students to reflect independently and silently for two minutes.

    • How do they perceive themselves physically?

    • Do they see themselves differently after seeing the clip?

Reflection

  1. Give each person in a small group a piece of the same coloured paper.  Make sure each small group has a different colour.

  2. Each person writes their name on their piece of paper then scrunches it up to resemble a snowball.

  3. Teacher says ‘snowball' and everyone throws their snowball to the group to the right of them.

  4. Each person then picks up or catches a snowball from the group to the left of them.

  5. The snowballs are unravelled and one positive affirmation is written about the person whose name is on the piece of paper (e.g. thank you for being caring).

    • Ensure the positive affirmations are not about their physical characteristics.

  1. The snowballs are then scrunched up and thrown to the right again and the process continues until each person has received their snowball back.

  2. Give the students 2 minutes to read and reflect on the positive affirmations other people have written about them.

  3. Discuss as a whole group how it feels to receive positive comments about yourself.  Do people agree with the comments other people have written about them? What other comments would you write about yourself?  Why?

  4. Give students 1 minute to add to their own snowball.

  5. Discuss as a whole group how the comments from others can impact on our identities positively and negatively.

References:

1. Mission Australia. Youth Survey 2018. Sydney: Mission Australia, 2018. 

2. Paxton, S. Research Review of Body Image Programs: An Overview of Body Image Dissatisfaction Prevention Interventions. Melbourne: Department of Human Services, 2002.